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Informal care and labour force participation among middle-aged women in Spain

Author

Listed:
  • David Casado-Marín

    ()

  • Pilar García-Gómez

    ()

  • Ángel López-Nicolás

    ()

Abstract

Informal care is today the form of support most commonly used by those who need other people in order to carry out certain activities that are considered basic (eating, dressing, taking a shower, etc.), in Spain and in most other countries in the region. The possible labour opportunity costs incurred by these informal carers, the vast majority of whom are middle-aged women, have not as yet been properly quantified in Spain. It is, however, crucially important to know these quantities at a time when public authorities appear to be determined to extend the coverage offered up to now as regards long-term care. In this context, we use the Spanish subsample of the European Community Household Panel (1994- 2001) to estimate a dynamic ordered probit and so attempt to examine the effects of various types of informal care on labour behaviour. The results obtained indicate the existence of labour opportunity costs for those women who live with the dependent person they care for, but not for those who care for someone outside the household. Furthermore, whereas caregiving for more than a year has negative effects on labour force participation, the same cannot be said of those who “start caregiving” and “stop caregiving”.
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Suggested Citation

  • David Casado-Marín & Pilar García-Gómez & Ángel López-Nicolás, 2011. "Informal care and labour force participation among middle-aged women in Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-29, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:series:v:2:y:2011:i:1:p:1-29 DOI: 10.1007/s13209-009-0008-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hiroyuki Yamada & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2014. "Labor Market Outcomes of Informal Care Provision in Japan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 14E004, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    2. Nguyen, Ha Trong & Connelly, Luke Brian, 2014. "The effect of unpaid caregiving intensity on labour force participation: Results from a multinomial endogenous treatment model," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 115-122.
    3. Bauer, Jan Michael & Sousa-Poza, Alfonso, 2015. "Impacts of Informal Caregiving on Caregiver Employment, Health, and Family," IZA Discussion Papers 8851, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Meghan M. Skira, 2015. "Dynamic Wage And Employment Effects Of Elder Parent Care," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 63-93, February.
    5. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:79-88 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Informal care; Female labour force participation; Panel data models; ECHP; Attrition bias; J14; J2; I10;

    JEL classification:

    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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