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Labor Market Outcomes of Informal Care Provision in Japan


  • Hiroyuki Yamada

    (Associate Professor, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP))

  • Satoshi Shimizutani

    (Research Fellow, Research Division, Gender Equality Bureau, Cabinet Office)


This paper examines the labor supply outcomes of family care provision for Japanese households in 2010, ten years after the introduction of the public long-term care insurance (LTCI) program. We found that family care provision for parents adversely affected labor market outcomes of main caregivers at home in terms of probability of working, employment status and hours worked. The adverse effect was found to be more serious for female caregivers than for male caregivers. Moreover, our results suggest that the public LTCI program seems to only partially mitigate the disadvantages of the main caregivers for both males and females.

Suggested Citation

  • Hiroyuki Yamada & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2014. "Labor Market Outcomes of Informal Care Provision in Japan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 14E004, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
  • Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:14e004

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Shimizutani, Satoshi & Suzuki, Wataru & Noguchi, Haruko, 2008. "The socialization of at-home elderly care and female labor market participation: Micro-level evidence from Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 82-96, January.
    2. David Casado-Marín & Pilar García-Gómez & Ángel López-Nicolás, 2011. "Informal care and labour force participation among middle-aged women in Spain," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 1-29, March.
    3. Van Houtven, Courtney Harold & Coe, Norma B. & Skira, Meghan M., 2013. "The effect of informal care on work and wages," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 240-252.
    4. Mayu Fujii & Takashi Oshio & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2014. "Self-rated Health Status of Japanese and Europeans in Later Life: Evidence from JSTAR and SHARE," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 65(4), pages 483-498, December.
    5. Heitmueller, Axel & Inglis, Kirsty, 2007. "The earnings of informal carers: Wage differentials and opportunity costs," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 821-841, July.
    6. Sugawara, Shinya & Nakamura, Jiro, 2014. "Can formal elderly care stimulate female labor supply? The Japanese experience," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 98-115.
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    9. Heitmueller, Axel, 2007. "The chicken or the egg?: Endogeneity in labour market participation of informal carers in England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 536-559, May.
    10. Michaud, Pierre-Carl & Heitmueller, Axel & Nazarov, Zafar, 2010. "A dynamic analysis of informal care and employment in England," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 455-465, June.
    11. Carmichael, Fiona & Charles, Susan, 2003. "The opportunity costs of informal care: does gender matter?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 781-803, September.
    12. Olivia S Mitchell & John Piggott & Satoshi Shimizutani, 2008. "An Empirical Analysis of Patterns in the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance System," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 33(4), pages 694-709, October.
    13. Lilly, Meredith B. & Laporte, Audrey & Coyte, Peter C., 2010. "Do they care too much to work? The influence of caregiving intensity on the labour force participation of unpaid caregivers in Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 895-903, December.
    14. Susan L. Ettner, 1996. "The Opportunity Costs of Elder Care," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(1), pages 189-205.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nishimura, Y.; Oikawa, M.;, 2017. "Effects of Informal Elderly Care on Labor Supply: Exploitation of Government Intervention on the Supply Side of Elderly Care Market," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/02, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

    More about this item


    Informal care; Caregiver; Long-term care insurance; Labor supply; Japan;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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