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A Latent Class Approach to Modeling Endogenous Spatial Sorting in Zonal Recreation Demand Models

  • Kenneth A. Baerenklau
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    A method for incorporating unobserved heterogeneity into aggregate count data frameworks is presented and used to control for endogenous spatial sorting in zonal recreation models. The method is based on latent class analysis, which has become a popular tool for analyzing heterogeneous preferences with individual data but has not yet been applied to aggregate count data. The method is tested using data on backcountry hikers for a southern California study site and performs well for relatively small numbers of classes. The latent class model produces substantially smaller welfare estimates compared to a constrained version that assumes homogeneity throughout the population.

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    File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/86/4/800
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    Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

    Volume (Year): 86 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 800-816

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    Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:86:y:2010:iv:1:p:800-816
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

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    1. Edward Morey & Jennifer Thacher & William Breffle, 2006. "Using Angler Characteristics and Attitudinal Data to Identify Environmental Preference Classes: A Latent-Class Model," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 34(1), pages 91-115, 05.
    2. Daniel Hellerstein, 1995. "Welfare Estimation Using Aggregate and Individual-Observation Models: A Comparison Using Monte Carlo Techniques," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(3), pages 620-630.
    3. von Haefen, Roger H., 2002. "A Complete Characterization Of The Linear, Log-Linear, And Semi-Log Incomplete Demand System Models," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
    4. Wedel, M, et al, 1993. "A Latent Class Poisson Regression Model for Heterogeneous Count Data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(4), pages 397-411, Oct.-Dec..
    5. Jeffrey Englin & Thomas Holmes & Rebecca Niell, 2006. "Alternative Models of Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Site Demand," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 35(4), pages 327-338, December.
    6. von Haefen, Roger H. & Phaneuf, Daniel J., 2003. "Estimating preferences for outdoor recreation:: a comparison of continuous and count data demand system frameworks," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 612-630, May.
    7. Jonathan J. Morduch & Hall S. Stern, 1995. "Using Mixture Models to Detect Sex Bias in Health Outcomes in Bangladesh," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1728, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    8. Moeltner, Klaus, 2003. "Addressing aggregation bias in zonal recreation models," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 128-144, January.
    9. Danielle Hagerty & Klaus Moeltner, 2005. "Specification of Driving Costs in Models of Recreation Demand," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 81(1).
    10. Bill Provencher & Rebecca Moore, 2006. "A Discussion of “Using Angler Characteristics and Attitudinal Data to Identify Environmental Preference Classes: A Latent-Class Model”," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 34(1), pages 117-124, 05.
    11. Bill Provencher & Kenneth A. Baerenklau & Richard C. Bishop, 2002. "A Finite Mixture Logit Model of Recreational Angling with Serially Correlated Random Utility," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(4), pages 1066-1075.
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