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Biases in Nutrient Management Planning

Listed author(s):
  • Chad Lawley
  • Erik Lichtenberg
  • Doug Parker

Nutrient management planning is seen as a means of improving efficiency and reducing environmental problems, however, these gains may not be realized if plans overstate fertilizer requirements. Using data from a survey of Maryland farmers, we find that nutrient management planning was adopted more frequently by larger operations raising grain or cattle, but not by those on more environmentally sensitive land. Independent consultants and fertilizer dealers were more likely to recommend increases in fertilizer use, consistent with fears about bias. Farmers preparing their own plans were more likely to recommend decreases in fertilizer use, suggesting the presence of hidden information.

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File URL: http://le.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/85/1/186
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Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Land Economics.

Volume (Year): 85 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 186-200

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:85:y:2009:i:1:p:186-200
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://le.uwpress.org/

References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Glenn Sheriff, 2005. "Efficient Waste? Why Farmers Over-Apply Nutrients and the Implications for Policy Design," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 542-557.
  2. JunJie Wu & Bruce A. Babcock & P. G. Lakshminarayan, 1996. "Choice of Tillage, Rotation, and Soil Testing Practices: Economic and Environmental Implications, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 96-wp161, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  3. Cooper, Joseph C., 1997. "Combining Actual And Contingent Behavior Data To Model Farmer Adoption Of Water Quality Protection Practices," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 22(01), July.
  4. Joseph C. Cooper & Russ W. Keim, 1996. "Incentive Payments to Encourage Farmer Adoption of Water Quality Protection Practices," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(1), pages 54-64.
  5. S. SriRamaratnam & David A. Bessler & M. Edward Rister & John E. Matocha & James Novak, 1987. "Fertilization under Uncertainty: An Analysis Based on Producer Yield Expectations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 69(2), pages 349-357.
  6. JunJie Wu & Bruce A. Babcock, 1998. "The Choice of Tillage, Rotation, and Soil Testing Practices: Economic and Environmental Implications," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 494-511.
  7. Keith O. Fuglie & Darrell J. Bosch, 1995. "Economic and Environmental Implications of Soil Nitrogen Testing: A Switching-Regression Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(4), pages 891-900.
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