IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea10/60892.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does Information Matter? Assessing the Role of Information and Prices in the Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Decision

Author

Listed:
  • Williamson, James M.

Abstract

This article investigates the impact of agronomic, environmental, and price information on the management decision of nitrogen fertilizer. Because excessive nitrogen originating from agricultural production activities can cause environmental degradation, understanding how information influences the nutrient application decision on the field is important for developing strategies for nitrogen load mitigation. I investigate the value farmers place on information about N management they receive from several sources. In particular, I evaluate how farmers use information from soil N-tests to make decisions about the rate of N to apply to the field. My results show that soil N-testing can be an effective management practices for reducing excess N applications. I find farmers who use a soil test reduce their use of commercial N by up to 14 lbs/ac relative to non-testers. I also find new evidence that rising fertilizer prices encourage farmers to manage N more carefully. I estimate a price elasticity of demand of between -0.6 and -1.29. I also show prices play a role in other forms of N management behavior, including application method and timing.

Suggested Citation

  • Williamson, James M., 2010. "Does Information Matter? Assessing the Role of Information and Prices in the Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Decision," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 60892, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea10:60892
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/60892
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. JunJie Wu & Bruce A. Babcock, 1998. "The Choice of Tillage, Rotation, and Soil Testing Practices: Economic and Environmental Implications," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 494-511.
    2. Satya Yadav & Willis Peterson & K. Easter, 1997. "Do farmers overuse nitrogen fertilizer to the detriment of the environment?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 9(3), pages 323-340, April.
    3. Jutta Roosen & David A. Hennessy, 2003. "Tests for the Role of Risk Aversion on Input Use," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 30-43.
    4. Fullerton, Don & Metcalf, Gilbert E., 2002. "Tax incidence," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 26, pages 1787-1872 Elsevier.
    5. Chad Lawley & Erik Lichtenberg & Doug Parker, 2009. "Biases in Nutrient Management Planning," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(1), pages 186-200.
    6. Bruce A. Babcock, 2011. "The Impact of Ethanol and Ethanol Subsidies on Corn Prices: Revisiting History," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 11-pb5, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    7. Glenn Sheriff, 2005. "Efficient Waste? Why Farmers Over-Apply Nutrients and the Implications for Policy Design," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(4), pages 542-557.
    8. Hansen, Lars Gårn, 2004. "Nitrogen Fertilizer Demand from Danish Crop Farms - Regulatory Implications of Farm Heterogeneity," MPRA Paper 48366, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Predrag Rajsic & Alfons Weersink & Markus Gandorfer, 2009. "Risk and Nitrogen Application Levels," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 57(2), pages 223-239, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nitrogen Fertilizer Application; Soil N-testing; Agronomic Information; Best Management Practices; Nonpoint Source Pollution; Demand and Price Analysis; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q24; Q28;

    JEL classification:

    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea10:60892. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.