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Causes and consequences of long-run currency appreciation: The Swiss case

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  • Peter Kugler

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Abstract

The econometric analysis of a panel of currencies after the transition to flexible exchange rates indicates that the real exchange rate of the Swiss franc against six major currencies is trend stationary and that the elasticity of the nominal exchange rate with respect to the relative price level is close to 1. Moreover, the dollar and pound real exchange rates appear unrelated to the GDP share of the Swiss financial sector over the years 1916-2010. This confirms previous findings for the pound and dollar for a currency panel during the flexible exchange rate period, namely, that the real appreciation of the Swiss franc in the flexible exchange rate period appears to be a “real” phenomenon not related to monetary and financial developments, and it mainly creates a risk for the stock of Swiss net foreign assets.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Kugler, 2017. "Causes and consequences of long-run currency appreciation: The Swiss case," Aussenwirtschaft, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, Swiss Institute for International Economics and Applied Economics Research, vol. 68(01), pages 83-100, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:auswrt:2017:68:01:83-100
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    4. Giorgio Fazio & Peter McAdam & Ronald MacDonald, 2007. "Disaggregate Real Exchange Rate Behaviour," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 389-404, September.
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    6. repec:mcb:jmoncb:v:45:y:2013:i::p:845-865 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Hansen, Bruce E, 2002. "Tests for Parameter Instability in Regressions with I(1) Processes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 45-59, January.
    8. Luca Antonio Ricci & Gian Maria Milesi‐Ferretti & Jaewoo Lee, 2013. "Real Exchange Rates and Fundamentals: A Cross‐Country Perspective," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 45(5), pages 845-865, August.
    9. Christoph Sax & Rolf Weder, 2009. "How to Explain the High Prices in Switzerland?," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 145(IV), pages 463-483, December.
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