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Universal Child Care and Long-Term Effects on Child Well-Being: Evidence from Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Catherine Haeck
  • Laetitia Lebihan
  • Philip Merrigan

Abstract

We evaluate the long-term effects of the Canadian province of Quebec’s $5 per day universal child care policy on child and youth well-being (health, behavior, motor and social development). Treated children are followed for more than 19 years. Estimates based on a nonexperimental evaluation framework show that the negative effects on preschoolers documented in previous studies persist over time for most outcomes. Once children enter school, only the impact on emotional disorder and anxiety persists, but the magnitude is smaller than for preschool children. For teens aged 12–19 years old, our estimates do not suggest that the effects persist.

Suggested Citation

  • Catherine Haeck & Laetitia Lebihan & Philip Merrigan, 2018. "Universal Child Care and Long-Term Effects on Child Well-Being: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(1), pages 38-98.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:doi:10.1086/696702
    DOI: 10.1086/696702
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/696702
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    Cited by:

    1. Lebihan, Laetitia & Mao Takongmo, Charles-Olivier, 2018. "The impact of universal child benefits on family health and behaviours," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(4), pages 415-427.
    2. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Simonsen, Marianne, 2016. "Academic performance and type of early childhood care," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 217-229.
    3. Daniel Kuehnle & Michael Oberfichtner, 2020. "Does Starting Universal Childcare Earlier Influence Children’s Skill Development?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(1), pages 61-98, February.
    4. Dietrichson, Jens & Kristiansen, Ida Lykke & C. V. Nielsen, Bjørn, 2018. "Universal preschool programs and long-term child outcomes: A systematic review," Working Paper Series 2018:19, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. DIARRA, Setou & LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2018. "Polygyny, Child Education, Health and Labour: Theory and Evidence from Mali," MPRA Paper 88518, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2018. "Mathematics Trajectories and Risk Factors During Childhood," MPRA Paper 88612, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. LEBIHAN, Laetitia & MAO TAKONGMO, Charles Olivier, 2019. "The Effect of Paid Parental Leave on Breastfeeding, Parental Health and Behavior," MPRA Paper 95719, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Catherine Haeck & Marie Connolly, 2019. "Point de vue sur l'accessibilité aux données des administrations publiques," Working Papers 19-04, Research Group on Human Capital, University of Quebec in Montreal's School of Management.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J18 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Public Policy
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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