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Judicial Efficiency and Firm Productivity: Evidence from a World Database of Judicial Reforms

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  • Matthieu Chemin

    (McGill University, CIREQ, and CIRANO)

Abstract

I assemble and classify a database of judicial reforms funded by foreign aid agencies as either comprehensive (targeting all characteristics of quality, speed, access) or limited reform. A triple difference is used to compare firms in countries with or without judicial reforms, before and after reforms, and in sectors more or less reliant on contract enforcement mechanisms, due to their need for relationship-specific investments. I find that externally financed comprehensive judicial reforms improve perceptions of judiciary efficiency (for all firms) and firm productivity (for sectors relying on relationship-specific investments) by 0.15 and 0.09 (22%) standard deviation, respectively.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthieu Chemin, 2020. "Judicial Efficiency and Firm Productivity: Evidence from a World Database of Judicial Reforms," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(1), pages 49-64, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:102:y:2020:i:1:p:49-64
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    Cited by:

    1. Sultan Mehmood, 2021. "The impact of Presidential appointment of judges: Montesquieu or the Federalists?," Working Papers halshs-03161933, HAL.
    2. Sultan Mehmood, 2020. "Judicial Independence and Development: Evidence from Pakistan," AMSE Working Papers 2041, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    3. Raffaela Giordano & Sergi Lanau & Pietro Tommasino & Petia Topalova, 2020. "Does public sector inefficiency constrain firm productivity? Evidence from Italian provinces," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(4), pages 1019-1049, August.
    4. Adamu Jibir & Musa Abdu & Farida Bello & Iliya Garba, 2019. "Do Institutions Promote Firm Performance? Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Review of Market Integration, India Development Foundation, vol. 11(3), pages 111-137, December.
    5. Sultan Mehmood, 2020. "Judicial Independence and Development: Evidence from Pakistan," Working Papers halshs-03054106, HAL.
    6. Giulia Canzian & Antonella Rita Ferrara, 2021. "Judicial Efficiency and Banks Credit Risk Exposure," CESifo Working Paper Series 8930, CESifo.
    7. Sultan Mehmood, 2021. "The impact of Presidential appointment of judges: Montesquieu or the Federalists?," AMSE Working Papers 2118, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    8. Raffaela Giordano & Sergi Lanau & Pietro Tommasino & Petia Topalova, 2020. "Does public sector inefficiency constrain firm productivity? Evidence from Italian provinces," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(4), pages 1019-1049, August.

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