IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Political and Legal Factors of Economic Growth in Russian Regions


  • Vladimir Mau
  • Konstantin Yanovskiy


The authors propose some new approaches in order to evaluate formally regional specifics of political and legal culture and institutes' impact on the dynamics of economic development of the regions and on the regions' investment climate. They demonstrate using a model that the influence of institutional factors, including some indicators for the basic individual rights maintenance in the regions, on economic growth is significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Vladimir Mau & Konstantin Yanovskiy, 2002. "Political and Legal Factors of Economic Growth in Russian Regions," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 321-339.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:14:y:2002:i:3:p:321-339 DOI: 10.1080/1463137022000013403

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Thorvaldur Gylfason & Gylfi Zoega, 2006. "Natural Resources and Economic Growth: The Role of Investment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(8), pages 1091-1115, August.
    2. Timothy Besley & Robin Burgess, 2002. "The Political Economy of Government Responsiveness: Theory and Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1415-1451.
    3. Alesina, Alberto, 1992. "Political models of macroeconomic policy and fiscal reform," Policy Research Working Paper Series 970, The World Bank.
    4. Clague, Christopher & Keefer, Philip & Knack, Stephen & Olson, Mancur, 1999. "Contract Intensive Money," MPRA Paper 25717, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Bruno, Randolph & Bytchkova, Maria & Estrin, Saul, 2011. "Institutions And Entry: A Cross-Regional Analysis In Russia," CEPR Discussion Papers 8283, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Leonard, Carol S. & Yanovskiy, Konstantin Ė. & Shestakov, D., 2014. "How Democracy could foster Economic Growth: The Last 200 Years," EconStor Preprints 121852, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    3. Marek Dabrowski & Oleksandr Rohozynsky & Irina Sinitsina, 2004. "Post-Adaptation Growth Recovery in Poland and Russia - Similarities and Differences," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0280, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Libman, Alexander, 2013. "Natural resources and sub-national economic performance: Does sub-national democracy matter?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 82-99.
    5. Randolph Luca Bruno & Maria Bytchkova & Saul Estrin, 2013. "Institutional Determinants of New Firm Entry in Russia: A Cross-Regional Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1740-1749, December.
    6. Libman, Alexander, 2008. "Federalism and regionalism in transition countries: A survey," MPRA Paper 29196, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Libman, Alexander, 2009. "Essays on Asymmetric Federalism," MPRA Paper 21591, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Konstantin Yanovskiy & Sergey Shulgin, 2013. "Institutions, democracy and growth in the very long run," Acta Oeconomica, Akadémiai Kiadó, Hungary, vol. 63(4), pages 493-510, December.
    9. Dawid Piatek, 2016. "Institutions and economic growth in transition countries — new experiences and implications from financial crisis 2007–2010 (Part 1)," Ekonomia i Prawo, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 15(4), pages 515-526, December.
    10. Alexander Libman, 2012. "Democracy, size of bureaucracy, and economic growth: evidence from Russian regions," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 1321-1352, December.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:pocoec:v:14:y:2002:i:3:p:321-339. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.