IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/oxdevs/v29y2001i2p189-207.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Food Insecurity, Soil Degradation and Agricultural Markets in West Africa: Why Current Policy Approaches Fail

Author

Listed:
  • Niek Koning
  • Nico Heerink
  • Sjef Kauffman

Abstract

The agricultural sector in West Africa is not at present capable of meeting the growing demand for food for its population and of reversing unfavourable trends in soil degradation. We argue that integrated soil management is an essential condition for sustainable agricultural development in the many regions in West Africa where population pressure forces an intensification of land use. Such an approach combines improved soil-moisture storage measures, and the use of organic and inorganic fertilizers and soil amendments. The synergetic effects which could result from this combination are indispensable for achieving the productivity increases needed to cope with the pressure of population. Current (neo-liberal and ecological-participationist) policy approaches are unable to realize the transition towards integrated soil management technologies. The time lags involved in learning to use new technologies, in the adaptation of technologies to local circumstances, and in reaping the benefits of soil fertility investments call for (at least temporary) support of agricultural incomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Niek Koning & Nico Heerink & Sjef Kauffman, 2001. "Food Insecurity, Soil Degradation and Agricultural Markets in West Africa: Why Current Policy Approaches Fail," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 189-207.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:29:y:2001:i:2:p:189-207
    DOI: 10.1080/13600810124747
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13600810124747
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McGuirk, Anya & Mundlak, Yair, 1991. "Incentives and constraints in the transformation of Punjab agriculture:," Research reports 87, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Pinstrup-Andersen, Per & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul, 1994. "Alleviating poverty, intensifying agriculture, and effectively managing natural resources.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Scherr, Sara J. & Yadav, Satya N., 1996. "Land degradation in the developing world: implications for food, agriculture, and the environment to 2020," 2020 vision discussion papers 14, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Vondolia, Godwin Kofi & Eggert, Håkan & Stage, Jesper, "undated". "Nudging Boserup? The Impact of Fertilizer Subsidies on Investment in Soil and Water Conservation," Discussion Papers dp-12-08-efd, Resources For the Future.
    2. Niels Batjes, 2004. "Estimation of Soil Carbon Gains Upon Improved Management within Croplands and Grasslands of Africa," Environment, Development and Sustainability: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Theory and Practice of Sustainable Development, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 133-143, March.
    3. Sheldrick, William F. & Lingard, John, 2004. "The use of nutrient audits to determine nutrient balances in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 61-98, February.
    4. Conceição, Pedro & Levine, Sebastian & Lipton, Michael & Warren-Rodríguez, Alex, 2016. "Toward a food secure future: Ensuring food security for sustainable human development in Sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 1-9.
    5. Shuhao, Tan, 2009. "Impact of Land Institutional Factors on Farm Management and Soil Quality," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51662, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:oxdevs:v:29:y:2001:i:2:p:189-207. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/CODS20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.