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Alleviating poverty, intensifying agriculture, and effectively managing natural resources.:

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  • Pinstrup-Andersen, Per
  • Pandya-Lorch, Rajul

Abstract

This discussion paper is the first in a series of papers prepared as part of IFPRI's 2020 Vision initiative, which seeks to develop an international consensus on how to meet future world food needs while reducing poverty and protecting the environment. It shows that poverty and environmental degradation in the developing world are inextricably linked with inadequate agricultural intensification. Increased investment in agriculture and poverty alleviation are essential for preventing further resource degradation and for meeting future food needs in a sustainable manner.

Suggested Citation

  • Pinstrup-Andersen, Per & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul, 1994. "Alleviating poverty, intensifying agriculture, and effectively managing natural resources.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:2020dp:1
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/publication/alleviating-poverty-intensifying-agriculture-and-effectively-managing-natural-resources
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    Cited by:

    1. Renkow, Mitch & Hallstrom, Daniel G. & Karanja, Daniel David, 2001. "Rural Infrastructure, Transactions Costs, And Marketed Surplus In Kenya," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20668, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    2. Pender, John L. & Place, Frank & Ehui, Simeon K., 1999. "Strategies for sustainable agricultural development in the East African highlands:," EPTD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Niek Koning & Nico Heerink & Sjef Kauffman, 2001. "Food Insecurity, Soil Degradation and Agricultural Markets in West Africa: Why Current Policy Approaches Fail," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 189-207.
    4. Gill, Gerard J., 1996. "Agriculture and natural resource management," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 317-332.
    5. Scherr, Sara J. & Yadav, Satya N., 1996. "Land degradation in the developing world: implications for food, agriculture, and the environment to 2020," 2020 vision discussion papers 14, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Ryan, James G., 2002. "Agricultural Research and Poverty Alleviation: Some International Perspectives," Working Papers 118375, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research.
    7. Pender, John & Ssewanyana, Sarah & Edward, Kato & Nkonya, Ephraim M., 2004. "Linkages between poverty and land management in rural Uganda: evidence from the Uganda National Household Survey, 1999/00," EPTD discussion papers 122, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Andam, Kwaw & Ahmed, Hanane & Richey, Jeffrey & Bruns, Bryan & Al-Wadaey, Ahmed, 2015. "Characterizing Rural Landscapes and Communities through Integrated Information: An Application to Yemen," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 210946, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Renkow, Mitch, 2000. "Poverty, productivity and production environment:: a review of the evidence," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 463-478, August.
    10. Scherr, Sara J. & Yadav, Satya N., 1996. "Land degradation in the developing world," 2020 vision briefs 44, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    11. Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Pender, John & Kato, Edward & Mugarura, Samuel & Muwonge, James, 2005. "Who knows, who cares?: determinants of enactment, awareness and compliance with community natural resource management," CAPRi working papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Malek, Mohammad Abdul & Hossain, Md. Amzad & Saha, Ratnajit & Gatzweiler, Franz W., 2013. "Mapping marginality hotspots and agricultural potentials in Bangladesh," Working Papers 154065, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

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