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Mapping marginality hotspots and agricultural potentials in Bangladesh

Author

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  • Malek, Mohammad Abdul
  • Hossain, Md. Amzad
  • Saha, Ratnajit
  • Gatzweiler, Franz W.

Abstract

Although Bangladesh made some remarkable achievements in reducing poverty and in improving social and economic outcomes in recent decades, about one-third of the rural population still lives below the upper poverty line most of whom depend on agriculture as their primary source of income. One of the reasons for their poverty is the low productivity that results from sub-optimal use of inputs and other technology. To foster agricultural productivity and rural growth, technology innovations have to reach all strata of the poor among small farming communities in rural Bangladesh. For that purpose, technology opportunities need to be brought together with systematic and location-specific actions related to technology needs, agricultural systems, ecological resources and poverty characteristics to overcome the barriers that economic, social, ecological and cultural conditions can create. The first step towards this is to identify underperforming areas, i.e. rural areas in which the prevalence of poverty and other dimensions of marginality are high and agricultural potential is also high since in such areas yield gaps (potential minus actual yields) are high and productivity gains (of main staple crops) are likely to be achieved. The marginality mapping presented in this paper has attempted to identify areas with high prevalence of societal and spatial marginality-– based on proxies for marginality dimensions representing different spheres of life-–and high (un/der utilized) agricultural (cereal) potentials. The overlap between the marginality hotspots and the high (un/der utilized) agricultural potentials shows that Rajibpur (Kurigram), Dowarabazar (Sunamgonj), Porsha (Naogaon), Damurhuda (Chuadanga), Hizla (Barisal), Mehendigonj (Barisal), Bauphal (Patuakhali) and Bhandaria (Pirojpur) are the marginal areas where most productivity gains could be achieved.

Suggested Citation

  • Malek, Mohammad Abdul & Hossain, Md. Amzad & Saha, Ratnajit & Gatzweiler, Franz W., 2013. "Mapping marginality hotspots and agricultural potentials in Bangladesh," Working Papers 154065, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:ubonwp:154065
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kumar, Anjani & Singh, K.M. & Sinha, Shradhajali, 2010. "Institutional Credit to Agriculture Sector in India: Status, Performance and Determinants," Agricultural Economics Research Review, Agricultural Economics Research Association (India), vol. 23(2).
    2. Kangni R Kpodar & Mihasonirina Andrianaivo, 2011. "ICT, Financial Inclusion, and Growth; Evidence from African Countries," IMF Working Papers 11/73, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Castro, Lucio, 2007. "Infrastructure and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment A Regional Analysis," MPRA Paper 6736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Datt, Gaurav & Ravallion, Martin, 1998. "Why Have Some Indian States Done Better Than Others at Reducing Rural Poverty?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 65(257), pages 17-38, February.
    5. Tara Bedi & Aline Coudouel & Kenneth Simler, 2007. "More Than a Pretty Picture : Using Poverty Maps to Design Better Policies and Interventions," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6800.
    6. Pinstrup-Andersen, Per & Pandya-Lorch, Rajul, 1994. "Alleviating poverty, intensifying agriculture, and effectively managing natural resources.:," 2020 vision discussion papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Husmann, Christine & von Braun, Joachim & Badiane, Ousmane & Akinbamijo, Yemi & Abiodun, Fatunbi Oluwole & Virchow, Detlef, 2015. "Tapping Potentials of Innovation for Food Security and Sustainable Agricultural Growth: An Africa-Wide Perspective," Working Papers 228855, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    2. Mbaye, Linguere Mously & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2016. "Natural Disasters and Human Mobility," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 10(1), pages 37-56, November.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:10:p:1866-:d:116132 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Iskandar, Deden Dinar & Gatzweiler, Franz, 2014. "An optimization model for technology adoption of marginalized smallholders: Theoretical support for matching technological and institutional innovations," Working Papers 182495, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    5. Baumuller, Heike, 2013. "Mobile Technology Trends and their Potential for Agricultural Development," Working Papers 160565, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    6. Schädler, Manuel & Gatzweiler, Franz W., 2013. "Institutional Environments for Enabling Agricultural Technology Innovations: The role of Land Rights in Ethiopia, Ghana, India and Bangladesh," Working Papers 159373, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    7. Siriwardane, Rapti & Winands, Sarah, 2013. "Between hope and hype: Traditional knowledge(s) held by marginal communities," Working Papers 151401, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

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