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Well-being of women in New Zealand: The changing landscape

Author

Listed:
  • Jessica Dye
  • Stephanié Rossouw
  • Gail Pacheco

Abstract

As the first country to give women the right to vote (in 1893), New Zealand (NZ) has often been viewed as a leader in the global movement towards gender equality. This paper aims to assess trends in overall well-being for NZ women, by pulling together a range of statistical indicators across five key facets of well-being: demographic and family changes, education, employment, health, and crime and violence. From our analysis, two contrasting pictures emerge. The first is that NZ women are clearly making up ground in respect of their education, participation in the labour force (less so in terms of wage equality), and overall health outcomes (barring mental health issues, such as depression). In the second, however, NZ women are trailing behind their other developed nation counterparts when one considers crime and violence, both committed against and by them.

Suggested Citation

  • Jessica Dye & Stephanié Rossouw & Gail Pacheco, 2012. "Well-being of women in New Zealand: The changing landscape," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(3), pages 273-302, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:nzecpp:v:46:y:2012:i:3:p:273-302
    DOI: 10.1080/00779954.2012.722845
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, July.
    2. Scott Fargher & Stefan Kesting & Thomas Lange & Gail Pacheco, 2008. "Cultural heritage and job satisfaction in Eastern and Western Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 29(7), pages 630-650, November.
    3. Gail Pacheco, 2011. "Estimating Employment Impacts with Binding Minimum Wage Constraints," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 87(279), pages 587-602, December.
    4. Robert H. Haveman & Barbara L. Wolfe, 1984. "Schooling and Economic Well-Being: The Role of Nonmarket Effects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(3), pages 377-407.
    5. Barbara L. Wolfe & Robert H. Haveman, 2002. "Social and nonmarket benefits from education in an advanced economy," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 47(Jun), pages 97-142.
    6. David Fergusson & Sheree J. Gibb, 2009. "Sources of the Gender Wage Gap in a New Zealand Birth Cohort," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 12(3), pages 281-298.
    7. Jerik Hanushek & Dennis Kimko, 2006. "Schooling, Labor-force Quality, and the Growth of Nations," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 1, pages 154-193.
    8. Kerry Papps, 2010. "Earnings inequality and gender in New Zealand, 1998-2008," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 217-229.
    9. Dean R. Hyslop & David C. Maré, 2005. "Understanding New Zealand's Changing Income Distribution, 1983-1998: A Semi-parametric Analysis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(3), pages 469-495, August.
    10. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
    11. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2004.040907_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Pacheco, Gail A. & Cruickshank, Amy A., 2007. "Minimum wage effects on educational enrollments in New Zealand," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(5), pages 574-587, October.
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    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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