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The impact of agricultural and trade policies on price transmission: The case of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan

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  • Abdulmajid Bobokhonov
  • Jan Pokrivcak
  • Miroslava Rajcaniova

Abstract

This paper examines the extent and speed of price transmission from international to local markets in two transition economies, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The two countries have similar economic backgrounds, but a notable difference is that Tajikistan has adopted a more liberal agricultural trade regime than Uzbekistan. We use a vector error correction model to analyse how global agricultural prices are transmitted to domestic food prices in the two countries. We find strong cointegration between world market and domestic prices in Tajikistan for food crops but not meat, and no cointegration in Uzbekistan.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdulmajid Bobokhonov & Jan Pokrivcak & Miroslava Rajcaniova, 2017. "The impact of agricultural and trade policies on price transmission: The case of Tajikistan and Uzbekistan," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(6), pages 677-692, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:26:y:2017:i:6:p:677-692
    DOI: 10.1080/09638199.2017.1287212
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jarilkasin Ilyasov & Linde Götz & Kamiljon Akramov & Paul Dorosh & Thomas Glauben, 2016. "Market Integration and Price Transmission in Tajikistan’s Wheat Markets: Rising Like Rockets but Falling Like Feathers?," Working Papers id:11177, eSocialSciences.
    2. World Bank, 2015. "World Development Indicators 2015," World Bank Publications - Books, The World Bank Group, number 21634, December.
    3. Lerman, Zvi & Sedik, David J., 2008. "The Economic Effects of Land Reform in Central Asia: The Case of Tajikistan," Discussion Papers 46249, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management.
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    Cited by:

    1. Miranda Svanidze & Linde Götz & Ivan Djuric & Thomas Glauben, 2019. "Food security and the functioning of wheat markets in Eurasia: a comparative price transmission analysis for the countries of Central Asia and the South Caucasus," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 11(3), pages 733-752, June.
    2. Buisson, M.-C. & Balasubramanya, Soumya, 2019. "The effect of irrigation service delivery and training in agronomy on crop choice in Tajikistan," Papers published in Journals (Open Access), International Water Management Institute, pages 81:175-184..
    3. Augusto Mussi Alvim & Eduardo Rodrigues Sanguinet, 2021. "Climate Change Policies and the Carbon Tax Effect on Meat and Dairy Industries in Brazil," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(16), pages 1-20, August.
    4. repec:zbw:iamodp:285032 is not listed on IDEAS

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