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Trade and migration flows between some CEE countries and the UK

  • Subrata Ghatak
  • Monica Ioana Pop Silaghi
  • Vince Daly

The recent enlargement of the European Union (EU) has enhanced interest in the causes and also the consequences of migration between Central and Eastern European (CEE) and Western European countries. This paper considers the possibility that some of these consequences make themselves felt in the trade flows between migrants' countries of origin and destination. Using a panel of data covering a number of CEE countries between 1996 and 2003, we employ an augmented gravity model to examine the effects of immigration from these transition countries on their bilateral trade flows with the UK. We pay attention to a number of issues that have been raised within the literature on gravity models. We find evidence that migration positively enhances the bilateral exports of the migrants' home country; however, there is less (but some) evidence that the imports from their destination country are also enhanced.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09638190902757426
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 61-78

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jitecd:v:18:y:2009:i:1:p:61-78
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  16. Ghatak, Subrata & Piperakis, Andromachi S., 2007. "The impact of Eastern European immigration to UK trade," Economics Discussion Papers 2007-3, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
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