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Objectives of public economic policy and the adaptation to climate change

Author

Listed:
  • Stine Aakre
  • Dirk Rubbelke

Abstract

Much can be learned about adaptation by applying structures and methodologies already used in other research fields. This study employs a public economic policy approach to investigate how - or if at all - adaptation should be supported by the public sector. Three different fields of adaptation activity are identified which are especially relevant for government intervention and the study proposes ways in which government intervention could be conducted. The analysis takes into account that developing regions are particularly vulnerable and they have insufficient funds to adequately adapt to climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Stine Aakre & Dirk Rubbelke, 2010. "Objectives of public economic policy and the adaptation to climate change," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(6), pages 767-791.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jenpmg:v:53:y:2010:i:6:p:767-791
    DOI: 10.1080/09640568.2010.488116
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kai A. Konrad & Marcel Thum, 2012. "The Role of Economic Policy in Climate Change Adaptation," CESifo Working Paper Series 3959, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Oberlack, Christoph & Neumärker, Bernhard, 2011. "Economics, institutions and adaptation to climate change," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 04-2011, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.
    3. Rübbelke, Dirk T.G., 2011. "International support of climate change policies in developing countries: Strategic, moral and fairness aspects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1470-1480, June.
    4. Claudia Schwirplies, 2015. "Adaptation vs. climate protection: Responses to climate change and policy preferences of individuals in China, Germany, and the USA," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201502, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    5. Oberlack, Christoph & Eisenack, Klaus, 2012. "Overcoming barriers to urban adaptation through international cooperation? Modes and design properties under the UNFCCC," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 03-2012, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.
    6. Stine Aakre & Ilona Banaszak & Reinhard Mechler & Dirk Rübbelke & Anita Wreford & Harvir Kalirai, 2010. "Financial adaptation to disaster risk in the European Union," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 15(7), pages 721-736, October.
    7. Oberlack, Christoph & Neumärker, Bernhard, 2013. "A diagnostic approach to the institutional analysis of climate adaptation," The Constitutional Economics Network Working Papers 01-2013, University of Freiburg, Department of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economic Theory.

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