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The Economics of Population Policy for Carbon Emissions Reduction in Developing Countries

  • David Wheeler
  • Dan Hammer
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    Female education and family planning are both critical for sustainable development, and they obviously merit expanded support without any appeal to global climate considerations. However, even relatively optimistic projections suggest that family planning and female education will suffer from financing deficits that will leave millions of women unserved in the coming decades. Since both activities affect fertility, population growth, and carbon emissions, they may also provide sufficient climate-related benefits to warrant additional financing from resources devoted to carbon emissions abatement. This paper considers the economic case for such support. [Working Paper No. 229]

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    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:3231.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:3231
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    1. Brian Blankespoor & Susmita Dasgupta & Benoit Laplante & David Wheeler, 2010. "The Economics of Adaptation to Extreme Weather Events in Developing Countries," Working Papers 199, Center for Global Development.
    2. Birdsall, Nancy, 1992. "Another look at population and global warming," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1020, The World Bank.
    3. Pritchett, Lant H. & DEC, 1994. "Desired fertility and the impact of population policies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1273, The World Bank.
    4. Enrique Delamonica & Santosh Mehrotra & Jan Vandemoortele, 2001. "Is EFA Affordable? Estimating the global minimum cost of 'Education for All'," Innocenti Working Papers inwopa01/15, UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.
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