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Adaptation to Climate Change in Low-Income Countries: Lessons from Current Research and Needs from Future Research

  • Stephen C. Smith

    ()

    (Department of Economics/Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

  • Arun S. Malik

    ()

    (Department of Economics/Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

This paper constitutes the introductory essay for the special issue of Climate Change Economics, edited by Malik and Smith, forthcoming in 2012, examining adaptation to climate change in low-income countries. The paper first characterizes different types of adaptations from an economic perspective. It then puts in context the contributions of two articles that address the problem of making adaptation decisions in the face of uncertainty with an emphasis on developing country circumstances. The paper then proceeds to examines data and methodological problems faced in empirical research on adaptation, and, as part of a broader review, examines contributions of two articles that present econometric evidence on adaptation in Ethiopia and India. The paper then introduces issues in the emerging research area of interactions between autonomous and planned adaptations and discusses contributions in the CCE special issue, particularly on how government agricultural extension affects farm household adaptation and how a government 'awareness' campaign encouraging behavioral responses to heat waves can reduce mortality. Finally, the paper identifies important questions on adaptation in low-income countries that still remain largely unaddressed.

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File URL: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/Smith_Malik_IIEPWP2012-08.pdf
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Paper provided by The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy in its series Working Papers with number 2012-8.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2012-8
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/
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  1. Marchiori, Luca & Maystadt, Jean-François & Schumacher, Ingmar, 2012. "The impact of weather anomalies on migration in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 355-374.
  2. Salvatore Di Falco & Gunnar Kohlin & Mahmud Yesuf, 2012. "Strategies To Adapt To Climate Change And Farm Productivity In The Nile Basin Of Ethiopia," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 3(02), pages 1250009-1-1.
  3. Barry Smit & Ian Burton & Richard Klein & J. Wandel, 2000. "An Anatomy of Adaptation to Climate Change and Variability," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 223-251, April.
  4. Martin L. Weitzman, 2009. "On Modeling and Interpreting the Economics of Catastrophic Climate Change," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(1), pages 1-19, February.
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  8. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00866436 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. William D. Nordhaus, 2010. "The Economics Of Hurricanes And Implications Of Global Warming," Climate Change Economics (CCE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 1(01), pages 1-20.
  10. Sebastian Kopf & Minh Ha-Duong & Stéphane Hallegatte, 2008. "Using Maps of City Analogues to Display and Interpret Climate Change scenarios and their uncertainty," CIRED Working Papers hal-00866436, HAL.
  11. Antony Millner & Simon Dietz & Geoffrey Heal, 2010. "Ambiguity and Climate Policy," NBER Working Papers 16050, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Robert J. Lempert & David G. Groves & Steven W. Popper & Steve C. Bankes, 2006. "A General, Analytic Method for Generating Robust Strategies and Narrative Scenarios," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(4), pages 514-528, April.
  13. Kolstad, Charles D., 1996. "Fundamental irreversibilities in stock externalities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 221-233, May.
  14. Fankhauser, Samuel & Smith, Joel B. & Tol, Richard S. J., 1999. "Weathering climate change: some simple rules to guide adaptation decisions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 67-78, July.
  15. Matthew E. Kahn, 2005. "The Death Toll from Natural Disasters: The Role of Income, Geography, and Institutions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(2), pages 271-284, May.
  16. Mendelsohn, Robert & Nordhaus, William D & Shaw, Daigee, 1994. "The Impact of Global Warming on Agriculture: A Ricardian Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 753-71, September.
  17. Geoffrey Heal & Bengt Kriström, 2002. "Uncertainty and Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 22(1), pages 3-39, June.
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