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Modelling the housing market in OECD countries

Listed author(s):
  • P. Arestis
  • A.R. González

Recent episodes of housing bubbles, which occurred in several economies after the burst of the United States housing market, suggest studying the evolution of housing prices from a global perspective. We utilise a theoretical model for the purposes of this contribution, which identifies the main drivers of housing price appreciation, such as, for example, income, residential investment, financial elements, fiscal policy and demographics. In a second stage of our analysis, we test our theoretical hypothesis by means of a sample of 18 OECD countries from 1970 to 2011. We employ the vector error correction econometric technique in terms of our empirical analysis, which permits us to model the long-run equilibrium relationship and the short-run dynamics, which also helps to account for endogeneity and reverse causality problems.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/02692171.2013.828683
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Review of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2014)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 131-153

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Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:28:y:2014:i:2:p:131-153
DOI: 10.1080/02692171.2013.828683
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/CIRA20

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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Plamen K Iossifov & Martin Cihak & Amar Shanghavi, 2008. "Interest Rate Elasticity of Residential Housing Prices," IMF Working Papers 08/247, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Bharat Barot & Zan Yang, 2004. "House Prices and Housing Investment in Sweden and the UK. Econometric analysis for the period 1970-1998," Macroeconomics 0409022, EconWPA.
  3. Fuest, Clemens & Huber, Bernd & Nielsen, Søren Bo, 2006. "Capital gains taxation and house price fluctuations," Working Papers 16-2004, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Economics.
  4. Vladimir Klyuev, 2008. "What Goes Up Must Come Down? House Price Dynamics in the United States," IMF Working Papers 08/187, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Andrea Nobili & Francesco Zollino, 2012. "A structural model for the housing and credit markets in Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 887, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  6. Gavin Cameron & John Muellbauer, 2001. "Earnings, unemployment, and housing in Britain," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 203-220.
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