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Social capital and economic growth: empirical investigations on the transmission channels

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  • Ghazi Boulila
  • Lobna Bousrih
  • Mohamed Trabelsi

Abstract

This paper explores the possible transmission channels of social capital to economic growth for a sample of some developed and developing countries during the period 1980-2000, using a simultaneous equation model. The main results of this paper are, first, the level of trust as a measure of social capital and growth are significantly and positively correlated; second, a high level of trust also has an indirect effect on economic activity through its effect on institutional development; third, such results are found to be robust statistically with the extreme bound analysis (EBA). It corroborates the fact that an improvement of the social infrastructure with high levels of trust and cooperation between individuals not only has a direct but also an indirect effect on economic growth through the development of institutions in the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Ghazi Boulila & Lobna Bousrih & Mohamed Trabelsi, 2008. "Social capital and economic growth: empirical investigations on the transmission channels," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 399-417.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:22:y:2008:i:3:p:399-417
    DOI: 10.1080/10168730802287994
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    2. Daniel Kaufmann & Aart Kraay & Massimo Mastruzzi, 2003. "Governance Matters III: Governance Indicators for 1996-2002," Development and Comp Systems 0308001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 1998. "Determinants of Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Empirical Study," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262522543, May.
    4. Kaufmann, Daniel & Kraay, Aart & Mastruzzi, Massimo, 2003. "Government matters III : governance indicators for 1996-2002," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3106, The World Bank.
    5. Levine, Ross, 2005. "Finance and Growth: Theory and Evidence," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 12, pages 865-934 Elsevier.
    6. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong-Wha, 2001. "International Data on Educational Attainment: Updates and Implications," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 541-563, July.
    7. Patrick Francois & Jan Zabojnik, 2005. "Trust, Social Capital, and Economic Development," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(1), pages 51-94, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Karla Borja, 2014. "Social Capital, Remittances and Growth," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(5), pages 574-596, December.
    2. Christian Bjørnskov & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2013. "Is trust the missing root of institutions, education, and development?," Post-Print CEB, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 157(3-4), pages 641-669, December.
    3. Christian Bjørnskov & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2012. "Trust as the missing root of institutions, education, and development," Working Papers CEB 12-031, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    4. Christian Bjørnskov & Pierre-Guillaume Méon, 2015. "The productivity of trust," Post-Print CEB, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, June.
    5. Javier Mejia, 2018. "Social Networks and Entrepreneurship. Evidence from a Historical Episode of Industrialization," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 016380, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    6. Jordaan, Jacob A. & Dima, Bogdan & Goleț, Ionuț, 2016. "Do societal values influence financial development? New evidence on the effects of post materialism and institutions on stock markets," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 132(PA), pages 197-216.
    7. Özcan, Burcu & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2011. "Social trust and human development," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 753-762.
    8. Devesh Roy & Abdul Munasib & Xing Chen, 2014. "Social trust and international trade: the interplay between social trust and formal finance," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 150(4), pages 693-714, November.
    9. Yuheng Li & Xun Wang & Hans Westlund & Yansui Liu, 2015. "Physical Capital, Human Capital, and Social Capital: The Changing Roles in China's Economic Growth," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 133-149, March.

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