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A Contribution on the Empirics of Trade, Migration and Economic Growth for Australia and Canada

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  • Philip Bodman

Abstract

This paper examines the long-run dynamic relationship between openness, migration and economic growth for Australia and Canada through the estimation of a long-run aggregate production function for each economy using the Johansen (1988) procedure. Through the disaggregation of the capital input vector entering into each cointegrating relationship, the paper also provides new evidence concerning the importance of human capital, dwelling capital, government infrastructure capital and research and development capital for long-run economic growth. The estimates from the empirical analysis suggest that net migration, openness and integration favours the productivity and growth performance of both Australia and Canada, although the magnitude of these relationships is not large. [E23, F15]

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Bodman, 1998. "A Contribution on the Empirics of Trade, Migration and Economic Growth for Australia and Canada," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 41-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:12:y:1998:i:3:p:41-62
    DOI: 10.1080/10168739800000028
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    2. Fariastuti Djafar & Mohd Khairul Hisyam Hassan, 2013. "Does Trade With Labour Sending Countries Reduce Demand for Migrant Workers: A Lesson from Malaysia," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(10), pages 1325-1336, October.

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