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The Determinants of Firm Exit from Exporting: Evidence for the UK

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  • Richard I. Harris
  • Qian Cher Li

Abstract

This study seeks to understand to what extent new exporters are able to survive in international markets and whether exit from exporting is more likely to be associated with firm-level heterogeneity or more general factors such as trade costs and/or barriers to entry and exit (such as sunk costs). This study presents the first analysis undertaken for a nationally representative group of UK firms on the determinants of exit from exporting, using panel data covering all market-based sectors of the UK during 1997--2003. Our findings suggest that the probability of a firm ceasing to export is directly influenced by its productivity and other attributes associated with firm-level productivity differences (such as size and foreign ownership). Micro-finance factors, such as profitability and the ability to finance through long-term debt, play an additional role. Lastly, sectoral differences (e.g. industrial concentration) also help explain the firm’s exit decision, whilst trade costs lead to a higher probability of exiting from selling internationally.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard I. Harris & Qian Cher Li, 2011. "The Determinants of Firm Exit from Exporting: Evidence for the UK," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 381-397, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:ijecbs:v:18:y:2011:i:3:p:381-397 DOI: 10.1080/13571516.2011.618611
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Timothy Dunne & Mark J. Roberts & Larry Samuelson, 1988. "Patterns of Firm Entry and Exit in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, pages 495-515.
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    3. Pankaj Ghemawat & Barry Nalebuff, 1990. "The Devolution of Declining Industries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(1), pages 167-186.
    4. Richard Disney & Jonathan Haskel & Ylva Heden, 2003. "Entry, Exit and Establishment Survival in UK Manufacturing," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 91-112, March.
    5. Manning, Richard L, 1994. "Changing Rules in Tort Law and the Market for Childhood Vaccines," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(1), pages 247-275, April.
    6. Richard E. Caves, 1998. "Industrial Organization and New Findings on the Turnover and Mobility of Firms," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 1947-1982.
    7. Klepper, Steven, 1996. "Entry, Exit, Growth, and Innovation over the Product Life Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 562-583.
    8. Christopher Ruebeck, 2004. "Model Exit in a Vertically Differentiated Market: Interfirm Competition versus Intrafirm Cannibalization in the Computer Hard Disk Drive Industry," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 26(1), pages 27-59, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:jqecon:v:15:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40953-016-0056-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Görg, Holger & Spaliara, Marina-Eliza, 2013. "Export market exit, financial pressure and the crisis," Kiel Working Papers 1859, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    3. Andrianos Tsekrekos, 2013. "Irreversible exit decisions under mean-reverting uncertainty," Journal of Economics, Springer, pages 5-23.
    4. Díaz-Mora, Carmen & Córcoles, David & Gandoy, Rosario, 2015. "Exit from exporting: Does being a two-way trader matter?," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-27.
    5. Chiara Franco & John P. Weche Gelübcke, 2015. "The Death of German Firms: What Role for Foreign Direct Investment?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(4), pages 677-703, April.

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