IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/worlde/v31y2008i2p212-235.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Evaluating the Contribution of Exporting to UK Productivity Growth: Some Microeconomic Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Richard Harris
  • Qian Cher Li

Abstract

This study assesses the contribution of exporting activities to aggregate productivity growth in the UK for all market-based sectors for the period 1996-2004, using a weighted FAME dataset. Based on decompositions of productivity growth, our findings suggest that, overall, exporting firms experience faster productivity growth than non-exporting firms and therefore contribute more to national productivity growth. In addition, aggregate productivity for exporters benefits from a large contribution from 'continuing' firms improving their productivity, as well as exporters that have been taken-over/merged or started-up as new firms. In contrast, most of the TFP improvement for non-exporters is attributable to lower productivity firms exiting, rather than from internal improvements or the productivity-enhancing impact of new firms. Copyright 2008 The Authors.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Harris & Qian Cher Li, 2008. "Evaluating the Contribution of Exporting to UK Productivity Growth: Some Microeconomic Evidence," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(2), pages 212-235, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:31:y:2008:i:2:p:212-235
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9701.2007.01087.x
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Haltiwanger, 1997. "Measuring and analyzing aggregate fluctuations: the importance of building from microeconomic evidence," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 55-78.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Parteka & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2013. "The Impact of Trade Integration with the European Union on Productivity in a Posttransition Economy: The Case of Polish Manufacturing Sectors," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(2), pages 84-104, March.
    2. Richard I. D. Harris & Qian Cher Li, 2010. "Export-Market Dynamics And The Probability Of Firm Closure: Evidence For The United Kingdom," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 57(2), pages 145-168, May.
    3. David Doloreux & Anika Laperrière, 2014. "Internationalisation and innovation in the knowledge-intensive business services," Service Business, Springer;Pan-Pacific Business Association, vol. 8(4), pages 635-657, December.
    4. Markus Eberhardt & Christian Helmers, 2010. "Untested Assumptions and Data Slicing: A Critical Review of Firm-Level Production Function Estimators," Economics Series Working Papers 513, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:pal:palcom:v:2015:y:2015:i:palcomms201535:p:15035- is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kazuhiko Yokota & Akinori Tomohara, 2009. "Extending the Learning-By-Exporting Hypothesis: Introducing a Credit Constraint," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 15(2), pages 169-177, May.
    7. Kazuhiko Yokota & Kyosuke Kurita & Shujiro Urata, 2016. "In Search of the Learning-by-Exporting Effect: Role of Economies of Scale and Technology," China Economic Policy Review (CEPR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 5(01), pages 1-27, June.
    8. repec:kap:iaecre:v:15:y:2009:i:2:p:169-177 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Elif Bascavusoglu-Moreau & Qian Cher Li, 2013. "Knowledge Spillovers & Sources of Knowledge in the Manufacturing Sector: Literature Review & Empirical Evidence for the UK," Working Papers wp451, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    10. Carlos Carreira, 2013. "Learning, Exporting and Firm Productivity: Evidence from Portuguese Manufacturing and Services Firms," GEMF Working Papers 2013-23, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    11. Naqeeb Ur Rehman, 2017. "Self-selection and learning-by-exporting hypotheses: micro-level evidence," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 7(1), pages 133-160, April.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:31:y:2008:i:2:p:212-235. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0378-5920 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.