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Stigma and Risky Behaviors among Male Clients of Sex Workers in the UK

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  • Marina Della Giusta
  • Maria Laura Di Tommaso
  • Sarah Louise Jewell

Abstract

Building on existing theoretical work on sex markets, this study uses data from the 2001 British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal) to replicate the analysis of the demand for paid sex. It formally tests the effects of attitudes, risky behaviors, and personal characteristics of a sample of men on the demand for paid sex. Previous theoretical work argues that stigma plays a fundamental role in determining both demand and risk, and in particular due to the presence of stigma, the demands for unpaid sex and for paid sex are not perfect substitutes. This study finds a positive effect of education (proxy for income), negative effects of professional status (proxies for stigma associated with buying sex), positive and significant effects of all risky behavior variables, and no significant effects of variables that measure the relative degree of conservatism in morals.

Suggested Citation

  • Marina Della Giusta & Maria Laura Di Tommaso & Sarah Louise Jewell, 2017. "Stigma and Risky Behaviors among Male Clients of Sex Workers in the UK," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 23-48, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:23:y:2017:i:3:p:23-48
    DOI: 10.1080/13545701.2016.1203453
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13545701.2016.1203453
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Casson, Mark, 1991. "The Economics of Business Culture: Game Theory, Transaction Costs, and Economic Performance," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198283751.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sonnabend, Hendrik & Stadtmann, Georg, 2018. "Good intentions and unintended evil? Adverse effects of criminalizing clients in paid sex markets with voluntary and involuntary prostitution," Discussion Papers 400, European University Viadrina Frankfurt (Oder), Department of Business Administration and Economics.

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