IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/kap/pubcho/v123y2005i1p115-131.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Working Well with Others: The Evolution of Teamwork and Ethics

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel Arce M.

    ()

  • L. Gunn

Abstract

In non-hierarchical environments such as teams and honor codes, effective self-management requires members to simultaneously address their dual roles as worker (agent) and monitor (principal). We employ an evolutionary analysis of teamwork where ethical behavior is voluntary, repetitive and related to an established norm. The explicit recognition of monitor–worker duality results in a unique and intuitive social contract that specifies the punishment must fit the crime. Our results are consistent with examples of successful team production, unraveling honor codes at colleges and teamwork and ethics as part of the MBA curriculum. Copyright Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Arce M. & L. Gunn, 2005. "Working Well with Others: The Evolution of Teamwork and Ethics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 115-131, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:123:y:2005:i:1:p:115-131
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-005-7523-0
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11127-005-7523-0
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harsanyi, John C, 1995. "Games with Incomplete Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 291-303, June.
    2. Noe, Thomas H & Rebello, Michael J, 1994. "The Dynamics of Business Ethics and Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 531-547, June.
    3. Ross Cressman, 2003. "Evolutionary Dynamics and Extensive Form Games," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262033054, January.
    4. Siqueira, Kevin, 2001. "Clubs and the Cost of Agency," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 107(3-4), pages 383-393, June.
    5. Telser,Lester G., 1987. "A Theory of Efficient Cooperation and Competition," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521306195, May.
    6. Rosemary Batt, 2001. "The Economics of Teams among Technicians," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 39(1), pages 1-24, March.
    7. Steen Thomsen, 2001. "Business Ethics as Corporate Governance," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 153-164, March.
    8. Nunez, Javier, 2001. "A model of self-regulation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 91-97, December.
    9. Noreen, Eric, 1988. "The economics of ethics: A new perspective on agency theory," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 13(4), pages 359-369, June.
    10. James M. Buchanan, 1992. "Economic Science in the Future," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 401-403, Fall.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rebecca VanMeter & Douglas Grisaffe & Lawrence Chonko & James Roberts, 2013. "Generation Y’s Ethical Ideology and Its Potential Workplace Implications," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 117(1), pages 93-109, September.
    2. Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, July.
    3. Hassani Mahmooei, Behrooz & Vahabi, Mehrdad, 2012. "Dueling for honor and identity economics," MPRA Paper 44370, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:kap:jbuset:v:147:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10551-015-2926-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Daniel G. Arce, 2007. "Is Agency Theory Self-Activating?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 708-720, October.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:123:y:2005:i:1:p:115-131. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.