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Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession

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  • Daniel G. Arce
  • Walter Enders
  • Gary A. Hoover

Abstract

This paper integrates survey data on economists' experiences and perceptions of plagiarism with a game‐theoretic model of author strategies to investigate whether information is being efficiently transmitted within the profession. The surveys reveal editorial misperceptions of the nature of plagiarism (e.g., plagiarism versus copyright infringement) and narrow assumptions about who bears the cost of plagiarism. Further, a wide disparity in author strategies to protect intellectual property rights exists, due to uncertainty over editorial response. These considerations are shown to lead to a Pareto‐dominated publication process. By contrast, simple measures such as a code of ethics and web‐based anti‐plagiarism software can improve the flow of information.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:60:y:2008:i:3:p:231-243
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8586.2008.00280.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8586.2008.00280.x
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    11. Gary A. Hoover, 2004. "Whose Line Is It? Plagiarism in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 487-493, June.
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    RePEc Biblio mentions

    As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography for Economics:
    1. > Economics Profession > Ethics in Economics > Plagiarism

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    Cited by:

    1. Joao Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andréas Novak, 2009. "Paradigm depletion, knowledge production and research effort," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00447302, HAL.
    2. Eric A Fong & Allen W Wilhite, 2017. "Authorship and citation manipulation in academic research," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 12(12), pages 1-34, December.
    3. Gary Hoover, 2006. "A Game-Theoretic Model of Plagiarism," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(4), pages 449-454, December.
    4. Mohan, Vijay, 2019. "On the use of blockchain-based mechanisms to tackle academic misconduct," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.
    5. Oana PIRNECI & Valentina RUJOIU & Octavian RUJOIU, 2015. "Examining Plagiarism From Cross-Cultural Perspective. Some Considerations," Proceedings of the INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 9(1), pages 351-358, November.
    6. Karpov, Alexander, 2016. "Evolutionary Justification of Plagiarism," MPRA Paper 70976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Hopp, Christian & Hoover, Gary A., 2017. "How prevalent is academic misconduct in management research?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 73-81.
    8. Altug Yalcintas & Isil Sirin Selcuk, 2016. "Research Ethics Education in Economics," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 74(1), pages 53-74, March.
    9. Anna Abalkina & Alexander Libman, 2020. "The real costs of plagiarism: Russian governors, plagiarized PhD theses, and infrastructure in Russian regions," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 125(3), pages 2793-2820, December.
    10. Bruce Lewis & Jonathan Duchac & S. Douglas Beets, 2011. "An Academic Publisher’s Response to Plagiarism," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 102(3), pages 489-506, September.
    11. João Ricardo Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andreas J. Novak, 2011. "Paradigm Depletion, Knowledge Production And Research Effort: Considering Thomas Kuhn'S Ideas," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 587-604, November.

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