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Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession


  • Daniel G. Arce
  • Walter Enders
  • Gary A. Hoover


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  • Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:buecrs:v:60:y:2008:i:3:p:231-243

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Luciano Andreozzi, 2004. "Rewarding Policemen Increases Crime. Another Surprising Result from the Inspection Game," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 121(1), pages 69-82, October.
    3. Rajeev K. Goel & João Ricardo Faria, 2007. "Proliferation Of Academic Journals: Effects On Research Quantity And Quality," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 536-549, November.
    4. Rajeev K. Goel, 2006. "The Game Academics Play: Comment," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(1), pages 19-23, January.
    5. Riyanto, Yohanes E & Yetkiner, I Hakan, 2002. "A Market Mechanism for Scientific Communication: A Proposal," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(4), pages 563-567.
    6. Daniel G. Arce M, 2005. "Subgame perfection and the ethics of competition," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(6), pages 397-405.
    7. Daniel Arce M. & L. Gunn, 2005. "Working Well with Others: The Evolution of Teamwork and Ethics," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 115-131, April.
    8. Gary Hoover, 2006. "A Game-Theoretic Model of Plagiarism," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(4), pages 449-454, December.
    9. Rajeev K. Goel, 2003. "A Market Mechanism for Scientific Communication: A Comment," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(3), pages 395-400, August.
    10. Walter Enders & Gary Hoover, 2006. "Plagiarism in the Economics Profession: A Survey," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(5), pages 92-107.
    11. Gary A. Hoover, 2004. "Whose Line Is It? Plagiarism in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 487-493, June.
    12. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
    13. Joao Ricardo Faria, 2000. "The Game Academics Play: Editors Versus Authors," Working Paper Series 105, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
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    Cited by:

    1. Oana PIRNECI & Valentina RUJOIU & Octavian RUJOIU, 2015. "Examining Plagiarism From Cross-Cultural Perspective. Some Considerations," Proceedings of the INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 9(1), pages 351-358, November.
    2. Karpov, Alexander, 2016. "Evolutionary Justification of Plagiarism," MPRA Paper 70976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:eee:jbrese:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:73-81 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Joao Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andréas Novak, 2009. "Paradigm depletion, knowledge production and research effort," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00447302, HAL.
    5. Altug Yalcintas & Isil Sirin Selcuk, 2016. "Research Ethics Education in Economics," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 74(1), pages 53-74, March.
    6. Bruce Lewis & Jonathan Duchac & S. Douglas Beets, 2011. "An Academic Publisher’s Response to Plagiarism," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 102(3), pages 489-506, September.
    7. João Ricardo Faria & Damien Besancenot & Andreas J. Novak, 2011. "Paradigm Depletion, Knowledge Production And Research Effort: Considering Thomas Kuhn'S Ideas," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 587-604, November.
    8. Gary Hoover, 2006. "A Game-Theoretic Model of Plagiarism," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 34(4), pages 449-454, December.

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