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A Game-Theoretic Model of Plagiarism

  • Gary Hoover

    ()

The damage to a reputation has long been viewed as the main and most effective deterrent against plagiarism among professional economists. We show that it is rational for individuals in the economics profession who want to plagiarize to engage in this activity given current incentives. Recent research concerning plagiarism in the economics profession has highlighted the frequency that instances of plagiarism have occurred. Our paper shows how it is possible given current incentives in the profession for these instances to go unreported therefore removing the threat of damage to a plagiarist’s reputation. We also discuss the harm that such actions cause to the original author and to the profession as a whole. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2006

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11293-006-9029-7
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Article provided by International Atlantic Economic Society in its journal Atlantic Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 34 (2006)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 449-454

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Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:34:y:2006:i:4:p:449-454
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  1. Walter Enders & Gary Hoover, 2006. "Plagiarism in the Economics Profession: A Survey," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 49(5), pages 92-107, October.
  2. Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, 07.
  3. Glenn Ellison, 2000. "The Slowdown of the Economics Publishing Process," NBER Working Papers 7804, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Gary A. Hoover, 2004. "Whose Line Is It? Plagiarism in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(2), pages 487-493, June.
  5. Glenn Ellison, 2002. "Evolving Standards for Academic Publishing: A q-r Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(5), pages 994-1034, October.
  6. List, John A, et al, 2001. "Academic Economists Behaving Badly? A Survey on Three Areas of Unethical Behavior," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(1), pages 162-70, January.
  7. George DeMartino, 2005. "A Professional Ethics Code for Economists," Challenge, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 48(4), pages 88-104, August.
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