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Paradigm depletion, knowledge production and research effort

  • Joao Faria


    (IPED - Institute for Policy and Economic Development - University of Texas-El Paso)

  • Damien Besancenot


    (CEPN - Centre d'Economie de l'Université Paris Nord (ancienne affiliation) - Université 13 - CNRS)

  • Andréas Novak

    (Department of Business Administration - University of Vienna)

This paper deals with two elements of Thomas Kuhn (1962) ideas regarding paradigm: Depletion and resiliency. The possibility of paradigm depletion taking resilience into account, given the hierarchy among scientists, is modeled as a Stackelberg differential game between editors [leaders] and authors [followers]. A number of results emerge from the model: i) Paradigm depletion can be optimal; ii) The optimal editor's shadow price of potential knowledge must be non-positive, if it is positive, the editor is just a keeper of the orthodoxy rather than a scientist; iii) Editor's and/or researcher's impatience is always bad for science; iv) In equilibrium editor's behavior does not matter for optimal research effort, while only editor's behavior matter for the paradigm.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series CEPN Working Papers with number halshs-00447302.

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Date of creation: 01 Dec 2009
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Handle: RePEc:hal:cepnwp:halshs-00447302
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  1. Daniel G. Arce & Walter Enders & Gary A. Hoover, 2008. "Plagiarism And Its Impact On The Economics Profession," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 231-243, 07.
  2. Berg, Nathan & Faria, Joao, 2008. "Negatively correlated author seniority and the number of acknowledged people: Name-recognition as a signal of scientific merit?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 1234-1247, June.
  3. Rajeev K. Goel & Jo�o Ricardo Faria, 2007. "Proliferation Of Academic Journals: Effects On Research Quantity And Quality," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(4), pages 536-549, November.
  4. Alberto Baccini & Lucio Barabesi, 2008. "Interlocking Editorship. A Network Analysis of the Links Between Economic Journals," Department of Economics University of Siena 532, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
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