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Is European Accounting Research Fairly Reflected in Academic Journals? An Investigation of Possible Non-mainstream and Language Barrier Biases

  • Bernard Raffournier
  • Alain Schatt

Recent research has revealed that most articles published in top US accounting journals come from institutions based in the USA or a small number of other English-speaking countries (Jones and Roberts, Journal of Business Finance and Accounting, 32(5/6), pp. 1107-1140, 2005). It has also been shown that the research paradigm favoured by US journals is financial economics, with the result that articles on accounting history or social and behavioural accounting are very scarce. European journals exhibit a more diverse content. Nevertheless, as shown by some studies, British authors are the main contributors to these journals. As a consequence, the assertion has been made that the published literature is not perfectly representative of the diversity of European accounting research. The aim of this study is to test the validity of this assertion by comparing the content of 18 major academic journals in accounting over five years (2000-2004) with the set of papers presented at the EAA congress in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The results give some support to the assertion that the diversity of European accounting research is imperfectly reflected in academic journals. They also are consistent with the idea that non-English-speaking scholars are at a competitive disadvantage in the race for publication in recognised periodicals.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal European Accounting Review.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 161-190

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Handle: RePEc:taf:euract:v:19:y:2010:i:1:p:161-190
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  7. Bonner, Sarah E. & Hesford, James W. & Van der Stede, Wim A. & Young, S. Mark, 2006. "The most influential journals in academic accounting," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 663-685, October.
  8. Brown, Lawrence D., 1996. "Influential accounting articles, individuals, Ph.D. granting institutions and faculties: A citational analysis," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 21(7-8), pages 723-754.
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