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Information costs and liquidity effects from changes in the FTSE 100 list

Author

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  • Andros Gregoriou
  • Christos Ioannidis

Abstract

In this paper we examine the stock price effect of changes in the composition of the FTSE 100 over the time period of 1984-2001. Like the S&P 500 listing studies, we find that the price and trading volume of newly listed firms increases. The evidence is consistent with the information cost/liquidity explanation. This is because investors hold stocks with more available information, implying that they have lower trading costs. This explains the increase in the stock price and trading volume of newly listed stocks to the FTSE 100 List. We find the reverse effect for the deletions from the FTSE 100.

Suggested Citation

  • Andros Gregoriou & Christos Ioannidis, 2006. "Information costs and liquidity effects from changes in the FTSE 100 list," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 347-360.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:eurjfi:v:12:y:2006:i:4:p:347-360
    DOI: 10.1080/13518470500249340
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pruitt, Stephen W & Wei, K C John, 1989. " Institutional Ownership and Changes in the S&P 500," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(2), pages 509-513, June.
    2. Barry, Christopher B. & Brown, Stephen J., 1984. "Differential information and the small firm effect," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 283-294, June.
    3. Scholes, Myron S, 1972. "The Market for Securities: Substitution versus Price Pressure and the Effects of Information on Share Prices," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 179-211, April.
    4. Merton, Robert C, 1987. " A Simple Model of Capital Market Equilibrium with Incomplete Information," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(3), pages 483-510, July.
    5. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1985. "Using daily stock returns : The case of event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-31, March.
    6. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-838, May.
    7. Kraus, Alan & Stoll, Hans R, 1972. "Price Impacts of Block Trading on the New York Stock Exchange," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 27(3), pages 569-588, June.
    8. Shleifer, Andrei, 1986. " Do Demand Curves for Stocks Slope Down?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 41(3), pages 579-590, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gregoriou, Andros & Gupta, Jairaj & Healy, Jerome, 2016. "Does Islamic banking increase the liquidity of stocks? An application to the Kingdom of Bahrain," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 132-138.
    2. Fernandes, Marcelo & Mergulhão, João, 2016. "Anticipatory effects in the FTSE 100 index revisions," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 79-90.
    3. repec:eee:finana:v:52:y:2017:i:c:p:228-239 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Witte, Björn-Christopher, 2013. "Fundamental traders' ‘tragedy of the commons’: Information costs and other determinants for the survival of experts and noise traders in financial markets," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 377-385.
    5. Gregoriou, Andros & Nguyen, Ngoc Dung, 2010. "Stock liquidity and investment opportunities: New evidence from FTSE 100 index deletions," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 267-274, July.

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