IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v45y2013i30p4323-4334.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The influence of macroeconomic factors on personal income distribution in developing countries: a parametric modelling approach

Author

Listed:
  • García
  • Prieto-Alaiz
  • Simón

Abstract

This article examines the influence of macroeconomic factors on personal income distribution in developing countries using a parametric modelling approach. The technique is based on the selection and estimation of a theoretical parametric model (a Dagum distribution) which fits accurately to the empirical income distributions of the countries examined. The parameters of the model specifically related to inequality are subsequently used as dependent variables in econometric models in order to examine the impact that certain macroeconomic variables (GDP growth, inflation, employment and real interest rates) have on inequality. The results reveal that GDP growth, employment rate and real interest rate are the macroeconomic factors with greater impact in shaping personal income distribution in developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • García & Prieto-Alaiz & Simón, 2013. "The influence of macroeconomic factors on personal income distribution in developing countries: a parametric modelling approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(30), pages 4323-4334, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:30:p:4323-4334
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2013.778952
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2013.778952
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Thornton, 2001. "The Kuznets inverted-U hypothesis: panel data evidence from 96 countries," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 15-16.
    2. Blinder, Alan S & Esaki, Howard Y, 1978. "Macroeconomic Activity and Income Distribution in the Postwar United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 60(4), pages 604-609, November.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Patrick Bolton, 1997. "A Theory of Trickle-Down Growth and Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(2), pages 151-172.
    4. Shaohua Chen & Martin Ravallion, 2010. "The Developing World is Poorer than We Thought, But No Less Successful in the Fight Against Poverty," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1577-1625.
    5. Martin Ravallion, 2003. "Measuring Aggregate Welfare in Developing Countries: How Well Do National Accounts and Surveys Agree?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 645-652, August.
    6. McDonald, James B. & Xu, Yexiao J., 1995. "A generalization of the beta distribution with applications," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 427-428, October.
    7. Branko Milanovic, 2005. "Can We Discern the Effect of Globalization on Income Distribution? Evidence from Household Surveys," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 19(1), pages 21-44.
    8. repec:bla:istatr:v:68:y:2000:i:3:p:277-293 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. FA Al‐Marhubi, 2000. "Income inequality and inflation: the cross‐country evidence," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(4), pages 428-439, October.
    10. McDonald, James B, 1984. "Some Generalized Functions for the Size Distribution of Income," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(3), pages 647-663, May.
    11. Carmelo Garcia Perez & Mercedes Prieto Alaiz, 2011. "Using the Dagum model to explain changes in personal income distribution," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(28), pages 4377-4386.
    12. Thomas Piketty, 1997. "The Dynamics of the Wealth Distribution and the Interest Rate with Credit Rationing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(2), pages 173-189.
    13. Kleiber, Christian, 1996. "Dagum vs. Singh-Maddala income distributions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 265-268, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Doerrenberg & Andreas Peichl, 2014. "The impact of redistributive policies on inequality in OECD countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(17), pages 2066-2086, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:30:p:4323-4334. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.