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Microeconomic consequences and macroeconomic causes of foreign direct investment in southern African economies

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  • Daniel Lederman
  • Taye Mengistae
  • Lixin Colin Xu

Abstract

The authors use a new data set on firms in 13 countries of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and comparators from other regions to identify the benefits and determinants of FDI in this region. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) has facilitated local development in the SADC. Foreign-owned firms perform better than domestic firms, are larger, and locate in richer and better-governed countries and in countries with more competitive financial intermediaries. They are also more likely to export than domestic firms and evidence suggests that they might have positive spillover effects on domestic firms. Based on a standard empirical model, the SADC is attracting the inward FDI per capita that the region's level of income would predict. But this means that there are less capital inflows per capita to the region than there are to wealthier parts of the developing world. Moreover, the SADC is attracting less FDI than comparators for reasons that are possibly more fundamental than current income, namely, countries’ past growth record, demographic structure and the quality of physical infrastructure. Interestingly, inward FDI is less sensitive to variation in income within the SADC than in other parts of the world, but is more responsive to changes in country's openness to trade.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Lederman & Taye Mengistae & Lixin Colin Xu, 2013. "Microeconomic consequences and macroeconomic causes of foreign direct investment in southern African economies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(25), pages 3637-3649, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:45:y:2013:i:25:p:3637-3649 DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2012.727978
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Harrison, Ann E. & Lin, Justin Yifu & Xu, Lixin Colin, 2014. "Explaining Africa’s (Dis)advantage," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 59-77.
    2. Lin, Yue, 2015. "Firm heterogeneity and location choice of Chinese firms in Latin America and the Caribbean: Corporate ownership, strategic motives and host country institutions," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 274-292.
    3. Toure Mamoudou & Cédric Achille Mbeng Mezui, 2017. "Working Paper 271 - Facteurs déterminants des IDE en Afrique," Working Paper Series 2388, African Development Bank.
    4. John Anyanwu, 2011. "Working Paper 136 - Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment Inflows to Africa, 1980-2007," Working Paper Series 327, African Development Bank.
    5. Morrissey, Oliver & Udomkerdmongkol, Manop, 2012. "Governance, Private Investment and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 437-445.
    6. repec:pje:journl:article27winv is not listed on IDEAS
    7. John C. Anyanwu, 2012. "Why Does Foreign Direct Investment Go Where It Goes?: New Evidence From African Countries," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, pages 425-462.
    8. Wenjie Chen & David Dollar & Heiwai Tang, 2016. "Why is China Investing in Africa? Evidence from the Firm Level," CESifo Working Paper Series 5940, CESifo Group Munich.
    9. Jonathan Munemo, 2014. "Business start-up regulations and the complementarity between foreign and domestic investment," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), pages 745-761.

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