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Productivity measures and effects from subsidies and trade: an empirical analysis for Japan's forestry

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  • Shunsuke Managi

Abstract

Several techniques have been proposed in the literature to measure productivity. While allowing for inefficiency of the production unit, we provide a methodological comparison of alternative approaches to measure total factor productivity. This article evaluates the effects of unintended policy outcomes such as government subsidies and foreign trade. Empirically, we analyse the forest productivity of timber in Japan by using panel data on 46 regions. The results suggest substantial variation in productivity between these two techniques although average trends are similar. We find that subsidies impede competition since the government is ready to rescue a loss-making firm with subsidies rather than allow it to close. In contrast, trade is shown to have positive effects on productivity.

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  • Shunsuke Managi, 2010. "Productivity measures and effects from subsidies and trade: an empirical analysis for Japan's forestry," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(30), pages 3871-3883.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:42:y:2010:i:30:p:3871-3883 DOI: 10.1080/00036840802360146
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    1. Bogetoft, Peter & Strange, Niels & Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark, 2001. "Efficiency and Merger Gains in The Danish Forestry Extension Service," Unit of Economics Working papers 24210, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Food and Resource Economic Institute.
    2. Sedjo, Roger, 1997. "The Forest Sector: Important Innovations," Discussion Papers dp-97-42, Resources For the Future.
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    5. Ian Noble & R. J. Scholes, 2001. "Sinks and the Kyoto Protocol," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 5-25, March.
    6. Jiro Nemoto & Mika Goto, 2003. "Measurement of Dynamic Efficiency in Production: An Application of Data Envelopment Analysis to Japanese Electric Utilities," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 191-210, April.
    7. Charnes, A. & Cooper, W. W. & Rhodes, E., 1978. "Measuring the efficiency of decision making units," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 2(6), pages 429-444, November.
    8. Kao, Chiang & Chi Yang, Yong, 1992. "Reorganization of forest districts via efficiency measurement," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(3), pages 356-362, May.
    9. Fare, Rolf & Shawna Grosskopf & Mary Norris & Zhongyang Zhang, 1994. "Productivity Growth, Technical Progress, and Efficiency Change in Industrialized Countries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 66-83, March.
    10. Peter Kennedy, 2003. "A Guide to Econometrics, 5th Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 5, volume 1, number 026261183x, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Heli Koski & Mika Pajarinen, 2015. "Subsidies, the Shadow of Death and Labor Productivity," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 15(2), pages 189-204, June.
    2. Managi, Shunsuke & Hibiki, Akira & Shimane, Tetsuya, 2014. "Efficiency or technology adoption: A case study in waste-treatment technology," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 586-600.
    3. Richard Harris & Shengyu Li, 2016. "Government Assistance and Total Factor Productivity: Firm-level Evidence from China, 1998-2007," CEGAP Working Papers 2016_04, Durham University Business School.
    4. Ang, Frederic & Kerstens, Pieter Jan, 2017. "Decomposing the Luenberger–Hicks–Moorsteen Total Factor Productivity indicator: An application to U.S. agriculture," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 260(1), pages 359-375.
    5. Koski, Heli & Pajarinen, Mika, 2013. "Subsidies, Shadow of Death and Productivity," ETLA Working Papers 16, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

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