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Political instability, political freedom and inflation

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  • Erdinc Telatar
  • Funda Telatar
  • Tarkan Cavusoglu
  • Umur Tosun

Abstract

Using a dynamic panel data approach, we estimate the impact of the political and institutional factors on inflation. Estimation results show that a lower degree of political instability generates lower inflation only for developed and low-inflation countries. However, when political freedom is taken into account, political instability appears to be influential on inflation also for developing countries and turns out to be significant only for high-inflation countries. Such findings emphasize the inflation-reducing effects of political stability depending on democratic political structure.

Suggested Citation

  • Erdinc Telatar & Funda Telatar & Tarkan Cavusoglu & Umur Tosun, 2010. "Political instability, political freedom and inflation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(30), pages 3839-3847.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:42:y:2010:i:30:p:3839-3847
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840802360237
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hanana Khan & Maran Marimuthu & Fong-Woon Lai, 2020. "Fiscal Deficit and Its Less Inflationary Sources of Borrowing with the Moderating Role of Political Instability: Evidence from Malaysia," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(1), pages 1-16, January.
    2. Adnan Haider & Musleh ud Din & Ejaz Ghani, 2011. "Consequences of Political Instability, Governance and Bureaucratic Corruption on Inflation and Growth: The Case of Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 50(4), pages 773-807.
    3. Florence Barugahara, 2015. "The Impact of Political Instability on Inflation Volatility in Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 83(1), pages 56-73, March.
    4. IRSHAD Hira, 2017. "Relationship Among Political Instability, Stock Market Returns And Stock Market Volatility," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 12(2), pages 70-99, August.
    5. Philipp Baumann & Enzo Rossi & Alexander Volkmann, 2020. "What Drives Inflation and How: Evidence from Additive Mixed Models Selected by cAIC," Papers 2006.06274, arXiv.org.

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