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Economic growth and religious production efficiency

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  • Esa Mangeloja

Abstract

Moral institutions, religions and ethics affect the economic development, as for example, trust and honesty are essential requirements for emerging economic activity. Religious production efficiency measure is constructed and used in economic growth regressions for 8 OECD countries. By using panel estimation methods and additionally time-series estimations for each country, more information is gained concerning the country specific growth and religion characteristics. Empirical evidence from the panel data estimations seems to suggest that religious beliefs attain more relevance than religious attendance. Religious production efficiency, containing both belief and activity aspects, was not found statistically significant with panel data or with individiual 8 OECD countries growth model, except for Finland. Significant coefficient for Finland can be explained by referring to Finland's unique religious market properties, as the level of religious beliefs have historically been unusually high in Finland. On the other hand, attendance in religious activities has followed the typical Northern-European decreasing trend. More exact understanding on the links between these concepts are essentially needed to better model the economic consequences of cultural, religious and moral variables.

Suggested Citation

  • Esa Mangeloja, 2005. "Economic growth and religious production efficiency," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(20), pages 2349-2359.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:20:p:2349-2359
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500217531
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. M. Castro Campos & C. Kool & J. Muysken, 2013. "Cross-Country Private Saving Heterogeneity and Culture," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 101-120, June.
    2. Sacit Hadi Akdede & Hakan HotunluoĆ°lu, 2008. "Economic Development and Religiosity: An Investigation of Turkish Cities," Papers of the Annual IUE-SUNY Cortland Conference in Economics,in: Proceedings of the Conference on Emerging Economic Issues in a Globalizing World, pages 261-271 Izmir University of Economics.
    3. L. Bettendorf & E. Dijkgraaf, 2008. "Religion and Income," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-014/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    4. Rietveld, C.A. & van Burg, E., 2013. "Religious beliefs and entrepreneurship among Dutch protestants," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2013-015-STR, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    5. Bettendorf, L. & Dijkgraaf, E., 2010. "Religion and income: Heterogeneity between countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(1-2), pages 12-29, May.
    6. Mangeloja, Esa & Ovaska, Tomi, 2010. "Mode of Delivery and the Effectiveness of Foreign Aid: The Example of Missionary Work," Review of Applied Economics, Review of Applied Economics, vol. 6(1-2).
    7. N'Dede Hourizene, Cynthia B. & Wilson, Norbert, 2016. "Contributing to Economic and Social Development in Sub-Saharan Africa through Value-Added Agriculture," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252792, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.

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