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Zero observations and gender differences in cigarette consumption

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  • Steven Yen

Abstract

Censoring mechanisms and gender differences are investigated for cigarette consumption by individuals in the USA. The Gaussian single-hurdle model is proposed which generalizes the specifications of Cragg (1971) and Heckman (1979) and allows examination of the empirical relevance of the two censoring mechanisms in the existing double-hurdle model. The proposed model performs better than Cragg's and Heckman's models but not as well as the double-hurdle model and also produces different elasticity estimates. The hypothesis of equal consumption parameters is rejected and demand elasticities found to differ between men and women. Income does not play a role and age has conflicting effects on the probability and level of cigarette smoking. Older individuals are less likely to smoke but, conditional on smoking, consume more cigarettes than their younger counterparts. Education has negative effects on the probability and level of smoking and can be an effective tool to curtail cigarette smoking.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Yen, 2005. "Zero observations and gender differences in cigarette consumption," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(16), pages 1839-1849.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:16:p:1839-1849
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500214322
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lundborg, Petter & Andersson, Henrik, 2008. "Gender, risk perceptions, and smoking behavior," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1299-1311, September.
    2. Mathias Sinning, 2011. "Determinants of savings and remittances: empirical evidence from immigrants to Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 45-67, March.
    3. Thomas Bauer & Silja Göhlmann & Mathias Sinning, 2007. "Gender differences in smoking behavior," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(9), pages 895-909.
    4. Frank Crowley & John Eakins & Declan Jordan, 2012. "Participation,Expenditure and Regressivity in the Irish Lottery:Evidence from Irish Household Budget Survey 2004/2005," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(2), pages 199-225.
    5. Kilic, Dilek & Ozturk, Selcen, 2014. "Gender differences in cigarette consumption in Turkey: Evidence from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 114(2), pages 207-214.
    6. Xiaohua Yu & David Abler, 2010. "Interactions between cigarette and alcohol consumption in rural China," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(2), pages 151-160, April.
    7. Andrew Tan & Steven Yen & Rodolfo Nayga, 2009. "The Demand for Vices in Malaysia: An Ethnic Comparison Using Household Expenditure Data," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 37(4), pages 367-382, December.
    8. David Aristei & Luca Pieroni, 2008. "A double-hurdle approach to modelling tobacco consumption in Italy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(19), pages 2463-2476.
    9. Jörg Schwiebert, 2016. "Evidence on copula-based double-hurdle models with flexible margins," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 245-289, August.
    10. Feng Zhang & Chung L. Huang & Biing-Hwan Lin & James E. Epperson, 2008. "Modeling fresh organic produce consumption with scanner data: a generalized double hurdle model approach," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 510-522.
    11. Rodríguez-Planas, Núria & Sanz-de-Galdeano, Anna, 2016. "Social Norms and Teenage Smoking: The Dark Side of Gender Equality," IZA Discussion Papers 10134, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Bilgic, Abdulbaki & Florkowski, Wojciech J. & Yen, Steven T. & Akbay, Cuma, 2013. "Tobacco spending patterns and their health-related implications in Turkey," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 1-15.
    13. Cihat Günden & Abdulbaki Bilgic & Bülent Miran & Bahri Karli, 2011. "A censored system of demand analysis to unpacked and prepackaged milk consumption in Turkey," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 45(6), pages 1273-1290, October.

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