IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Role of Education in Cigarette Smoking: An Analysis of Malaysian Household Survey Data


  • Andrew K.G. Tan
  • Steven T. Yen
  • Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr.


Heckman's sample selection model is used to examine the role of education on household purchase decisions and expenditures of tobacco products in Malaysia. Results of the marginal effects of education, segmented by ethnic and gender groups, suggest that education decreases the probability, conditional levels and unconditional levels of tobacco expenditures amongst Malaysian households. Specifically, an additional year of education of the household head, irrespective of ethnic or gender considerations, decreases smoking probability by 1.5 percent. However, the negative effect of education seems to be higher for Chinese (US$1.07) than Malay (US$0.26) households in terms of conditional expenditures. Furthermore, education significantly decreases conditional tobacco expenditures within male-headed households. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 East Asian Economic Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew K.G. Tan & Steven T. Yen & Rodolfo M. Nayga, Jr., 2009. "Role of Education in Cigarette Smoking: An Analysis of Malaysian Household Survey Data," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 1-17, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:23:y:2009:i:1:p:1-17

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hill, T P, 1977. "On Goods and Services," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 23(4), pages 315-338, December.
    2. Mulder, N., 1994. "Transport and Communication in Mexico and the United States: Value Added , Purchasing Power Parities and Productivity," Papers 579, Groningen State, Institute of Economic Research-.
    3. Soi Lam & Trinh Toan, 2006. "Land Transport Policy and Public Transport in Singapore," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 171-188, March.
    4. Kim-Song Tan & Sock-Yong Phang, 2004. "From Efficiency-driven to Innovation-driven Economic Growth: Perspectives from Singapore," Working Papers 15-2004, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    5. Lu, Ding & Yu, Qiao, 1999. "Hong Kong's exchange rate regime:: Lessons from Singapore," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 122-140.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura, 2016. "Effects of Female Labor Participation on Smoking Behavior in Japan: Selection Model Approach," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 59(3), pages 1-18.
    2. Andrew Tan, 2012. "Distinguishing Between Non-Smokers, Casual Smokers, and Compulsive Smokers: Evidence from Malaysia," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(2), pages 173-184, June.
    3. Yen, Steven T. & Shaw, W. Douglass & Yuan, Yan, 2010. "Cigarette smoking and self-reported health in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 532-543, December.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:asiaec:v:23:y:2009:i:1:p:1-17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.