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The Impact Of Antismoking Policies In Korea On Quit Success And Smoking Intentions

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  • SEONGHOON HONG
  • ALAN R. COLLINS

Abstract

"In 2001 and 2002, the Korean government dramatically increased cigarette taxes, anti-smoking advertisements, and smoking prohibitions as part of an anti-smoking campaign. This paper examines the impacts of these policy changes by modeling quit success and smoking intentions pre- and post-policy and attributing model differences to anti-smoking policies. Model results provide evidence that national anti-smoking policies increased both quitting success and intention to quit. However, the impacts of these policies are uneven throughout Korean society. Females and those who exercise for health maintenance experienced higher quit success. Heavy smokers and high frequency alcohol drinkers stated they are less likely to quit smoking post-policy. One impact of national anti-smoking policies is reduced provincial differences among Koreans in both quit success and intention to quit. Future anti-smoking policies should address the different needs of these groups." ("JEL" D12, I19) Copyright (c) 2009 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Seonghoon Hong & Alan R. Collins, 2010. "The Impact Of Antismoking Policies In Korea On Quit Success And Smoking Intentions," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 28(4), pages 474-487, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:28:y:2010:i:4:p:474-487
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lydia Lawless & Andreas Drichoutis & Rodolfo Nayga, 2013. "Time preferences and health behaviour: a review," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-19, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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