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“A Pack A Day For Twenty Years”:Smoking And Cigarette Pack Sizes


  • Lisa Farrell
  • Tim R. L. Fry
  • Mark N. Harris


The extensive literature on smoking behaviour has focused on numerous aspects such as the factors that influence the decision to start smoking and, for smokers, what factors influence consumption and decisions to quit. This study focuses on the determinants of the typical daily volume of cigarette consumption. In particular the impact of cigarette pack sizes on the typical daily consumption of smokers is investigated. Results are presented from a statistical model which allows for ‘pack-effects’ in daily consumption levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa Farrell & Tim R. L. Fry & Mark N. Harris, 2003. "“A Pack A Day For Twenty Years”:Smoking And Cigarette Pack Sizes," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 887, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mlb:wpaper:887

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Chaloupka, Frank, 1991. "Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 722-742, August.
    2. Mullahy, John, 1986. "Specification and testing of some modified count data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 341-365, December.
    3. Sander, William, 1995. "Schooling and Quitting Smoking," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 191-199, February.
    4. Jeffrey E. Harris & Sandra W. Chan, 1999. "The continuum-of-addiction: cigarette smoking in relation to price among Americans aged 15-29," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 81-86.
    5. Jones, Andrew M., 1994. "Health, addiction, social interaction and the decision to quit smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 93-110, March.
    6. Kenkel, D.S., 1989. "Should You Eat Breakfast? Estimates From Health Production Functions," Papers 9-90-8, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    7. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
    8. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios, 2002. "Putting Out the Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce the Onset of Youth Smoking?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 144-169, February.
    9. William H. Greene, 1994. "Accounting for Excess Zeros and Sample Selection in Poisson and Negative Binomial Regression Models," Working Papers 94-10, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    10. Kinsey, Jean, 1981. " Determinants of Credit Card Accounts: An Application of Tobit Analysis," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 172-182, September.
    11. Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Ulrich, 1995. "An Econometric Model of the Two-Part Decisionmaking Process in the Demand for Health Care," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 339-361.
    12. Wasserman, Jeffrey & Manning, Willard G. & Newhouse, Joseph P. & Winkler, John D., 1991. "The effects of excise taxes and regulations on cigarette smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 43-64, May.
    13. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xueyan Zhao & Mark Harris, 2004. "Modelling Tobacco Consumption with a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit Model," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 363, Econometric Society.

    More about this item


    Smoking; count data; pack sizes;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health


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