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Convergence in Sub-Saharan Africa: a nonstationary panel data approach

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  • Suzanne McCoskey

Abstract

Given the development of time series econometrics and nonstationary data analysis, St. Aubyn (Empirical Economics, 24, 23-44, 1999) demonstrates a new paradigm for testing income convergence, or better defined, income stability, namely testing the stationarity of pair-wise income differentials. In this paper, a panel data set of Sub-Saharan African countries is constructed and panel cointegration and unit root tests are used to investigate the convergence properties of incomes and standards of living within Africa. Overall, little evidence is found to substantiate claims of convergence across Africa, although in some cases, smaller convergence clubs within Africa may be found. In addition the use of nonstationary panel data techniques is proposed for the testing and establishing of coherent convergence clubs.

Suggested Citation

  • Suzanne McCoskey, 2002. "Convergence in Sub-Saharan Africa: a nonstationary panel data approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(7), pages 819-829.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:7:p:819-829
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840110061668
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jamie Emerson & Chihwa Kao, 2000. "Testing for Structural Change of a Time Trend Regression in Panel Data," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 15, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    2. Danny Quah, 1996. "Convergence as Distribution Dynamics (with or without Growth)," CEP Discussion Papers dp0317, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Quah, Danny, 1996. "Convergence as distribution dynamics (with or without growth)," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2254, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Steven N. Durlauf & Paul A. Johnson, 1992. "Local Versus Global Convergence Across National Economies," NBER Working Papers 3996, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Busse & Ceren Erdogan & Henning Mühlen, 2016. "China's Impact on Africa – The Role of Trade, FDI and Aid," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(2), pages 228-262, May.
    2. Matsuki, Takashi & Usami, Ryoichi, 2007. "China's Regional Convergence in Panels with Multiple Structural Breaks," MPRA Paper 10167, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 17 May 2008.
    3. Anthony Rezitis, 2005. "Agricultural productivity convergence across Europe and the United States of America," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(7), pages 443-446.
    4. Amélie Charles & Olivier Darné & Jean-François Hoarau, 2009. "Does the real GDP per capita convergence hold in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa?," Working Papers hal-00422522, HAL.
    5. Sabyasachi Kar & Debajit Jha & Alpana Kateja, 2011. "Club-convergence and polarization of states: A nonparametric analysis of post-reform India," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 53-72, April.
    6. Baliamoune, Mina N., 2002. "Assessing the Impact of One Aspect of Globalization on Economic Growth in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 091, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Mohamed Siry Bah & Thomas Jobert, 2015. "Une analyse empirique du processus de convergence des pays africains," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-33, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    8. Amélie Charles & Olivier Darne & Jean-François Hoarau, 2012. "Convergence of real per capita GDP within COMESA countries: A panel unit root evidence," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 49(1), pages 53-71, August.
    9. John Ssozi & Simplice A. Asongu, 2016. "The Comparative Economics of Catch-up in Output per Worker, Total Factor Productivity and Technological Gain in Sub-Saharan Africa," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 215-228, June.
    10. Burcu Ozcan, 2014. "Does Income Converge among EU Member Countries following the Post-War Period? Evidence from the PANKPSS Test," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(3), pages 22-38, October.
    11. Arbache, Jorge Saba & Page, John, 2008. "Hunting for Leopards: Long-Run Country Income Dynamics in Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 080, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2005. "Regional convergence, inequality, and space," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(2), pages 155-176, April.
    13. Zheng Ying & Chang-Rui Dong & Hsu-Ling Chang & Chi-Wei Su, 2014. "Are Real GDP Levels Stationary in African Countries?," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 82(3), pages 392-401, September.
    14. repec:ags:jaecon:37134 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Busse, Matthias & Erdogan, Ceren & Mühlen, Henning, 2017. "Structural transformation and its relevance for economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 23-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    16. Matsuki, Takashi & Usami, Ryoichi, 2008. "Long-run growth patterns within Asian NIEs: Empirical analysis based on the panel unit root test, allowing the heterogeneity of time trend and endogenous multiple structural breaks," MPRA Paper 11541, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Sergio J. Rey & Mark V. Janikas, 2003. "Convergence and space," Urban/Regional 0311002, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 16 Nov 2003.
    18. Romero-Ávila, Diego, 2009. "Multiple Breaks, Terms of Trade Shocks and the Unit-Root Hypothesis for African Per Capita Real GDP," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1051-1068, June.
    19. Holmes, Mark J., 2005. "New Evidence on Long-Run Output Convergence Among Latin American Countries," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-21, November.
    20. Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Manuchehr Irandoust, 2006. "The response of industry employment to exchange rate shocks: evidence from panel cointegration," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 415-421.

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