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Impact of food safety information on US poultry demand


  • Lijia Mo


The impact of poultry product recall events on consumer demand in the US was empirically tested for four major categories of poultry: broiler (young chicken), eggs, turkey and other chicken (mature or nonbroiler chicken). From 2000 to 2004, poultry Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) recall events had a consistent positive impact on demand for turkey but no significant impact on other types of poultry products. United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) -- FSIS recall, as a complement to food labelling, did not undermine poultry consumption but promoted turkey demands. On the contrary, media recall undermined poultry demands. Moreover, it demonstrated that turkey consumers were a special behaviour group of poultry consumers.

Suggested Citation

  • Lijia Mo, 2013. "Impact of food safety information on US poultry demand," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(9), pages 1121-1131, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:45:y:2013:i:9:p:1121-1131
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.613796

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Browning & Lars Gårn Hansen & Sinne Smed, 2013. "Rational inattention or rational overreaction? Consumer reactions to health news," IFRO Working Paper 2013/14, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.

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