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Purchasing Power Parity and real exchange rate behaviour in Africa

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  • Joseph Kargbo

Abstract

African policy makers have being implementing exchange rate policy reforms based on the assumption that long-run PPP holds in Africa. This study conducted a detailed empirical investigation to ascertain whether or not there is empirical support for long-run PPP in African countries. Because of the significant black market premium, we applied Johansen's cointegration method to annual data on official and black market exchange rates, and the GDP deflators of 40 countries covering the 1958-2003 period. The research shows overwhelming support for long-run PPP in Africa, thus, PPP is a reliable guide for exchange rate determination and exchange rate policy reform in African countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Joseph Kargbo, 2006. "Purchasing Power Parity and real exchange rate behaviour in Africa," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1-2), pages 169-183.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:16:y:2006:i:1-2:p:169-183
    DOI: 10.1080/09603100500389291
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jean Imbs & Haroon Mumtaz & Morten O. Ravn & Hélène Rey, 2005. "PPP Strikes Back: Aggregation And the Real Exchange Rate," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(1), pages 1-43.
    2. Luca A Ricci & Ronald MacDonald, 2002. "Purchasing Power Parity and New Trade Theory," IMF Working Papers 02/32, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Paul Cashin & C. John McDermott, 2003. "An Unbiased Appraisal of Purchasing Power Parity," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(3), pages 1-1.
    4. Michel Galy & Michael T. Hadjimichael, 1997. "The CFA Franc Zone and the EMU," IMF Working Papers 97/156, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Davidson, Russell & MacKinnon, James G., 1993. "Estimation and Inference in Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195060119.
    6. G. MacDonald & D. Allen & S. Cruickshank, 2002. "Purchasing Power Parity-evidence from a new panel test," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(11), pages 1319-1324.
    7. Jun Nagayasu, 1998. "Does the Long-Run Ppp Hypothesis Hold for Africa? Evidence From Panel Co-Integration Study," IMF Working Papers 98/123, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cushman, David O., 2008. "Long-run PPP in a system context: No favorable evidence after all for the U.S., Germany, and Japan," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 413-424, December.
    2. Jean-Francois Hoarau, 2010. "Does long-run purchasing power parity hold in Eastern and Southern African countries? Evidence from panel data stationary tests with multiple structural breaks," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 307-315.
    3. Ahmad, Ahmad Hassan & Aworinde, Olalekan Bashir, 2016. "The role of structural breaks, nonlinearity and asymmetric adjustments in African bilateral real exchange rates," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 144-159.
    4. Ntokozo Patrick Nzimande & Marcel Kohler, 2016. "On the Validity of Purchasing Power Parity: Evidence from Energy Exporting Sub-Saharan Africa Countries," SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, SPOUDAI Journal of Economics and Business, University of Piraeus, vol. 66(3), pages 71-82, July-Sept.
    5. Olalekan Bashir Aworinde, 2014. "Are Bilateral Real Exchange Rates Stationary? Empirical Evidence from Nigeria," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 271-286.
    6. Paul Alagidede & George Tweneboah & Anokye M. Adam, 2008. "Nominal Exchange Rates and Price Convergence in the West African Monetary Zone," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 7(3), pages 181-198, December.
    7. Arize, Augustine C., 2011. "Purchasing power parity in LDCs: An empirical investigation," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 56-71.
    8. Phiri, Andrew, 2014. "Purchasing power parity (PPP) between South Africa and her main currency exchange partners: Evidence from asymmetric unit root tests and threshold co-integration analysis," MPRA Paper 53659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Riané de Bruyn & Rangan Gupta & Lardo Stander, 2013. "Testing the Monetary Model for Exchange Rate Determination in South Africa: Evidence from 101 Years of Data," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 7(1), March.
    10. Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Siti Hamizah Mohd & Siew-Voon Soon, 2011. "Purchasing Power Parity and Efficiency of Black Market Exchange Rate in African Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(5), pages 52-70, September.

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