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Modelling the composition of personal sector wealth in the UK


  • David Blake


The allocation of UK personal sector wealth across five broad asset categories (net financial wealth, housing (and durable assets) wealth, state pension wealth, private pension wealth, and human capital) is investigated using the FAIDS (financial AIDS) model. Apart from total wealth and returns, additional variables relating to capital market imperfections, and demographic, labour market and cross-sector spillover effects turn out to be significant. The adjustment of portfolio weights to shocks is very slow, taking up to 21 years for some asset categories.

Suggested Citation

  • David Blake, 2004. "Modelling the composition of personal sector wealth in the UK," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(9), pages 611-630.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:14:y:2004:i:9:p:611-630 DOI: 10.1080/0960310042000233395

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Barro, Robert J, 1974. "Are Government Bonds Net Wealth?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1095-1117, Nov.-Dec..
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    9. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bonizzi, Bruno, 2017. "Institutional investors’ allocation to emerging markets: A panel approach to asset demand," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 47-64.
    2. Richard Ochmann, 2014. "Differential income taxation and household asset allocation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(8), pages 880-894, March.
    3. John Muellbauer & John Duca, 2012. "Tobin Lives: Integrating evolving credit market architecture into flow of funds based macro-models," Economics Series Working Papers 622, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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