IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Muscle drain versus brain gain in association football: technology transfer through player emigration and manager immigration

To test theories of migration and economic development, this article examines whether international football teams benefit from having players playing abroad in stronger leagues and from employing managers from countries with stronger leagues. The results provide evidence in support of the former effect. However, there is a negative impact from employing managers from countries with superior leagues.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13504851.2013.870641
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 21 (2014)
Issue (Month): 7 (May)
Pages: 490-493

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:21:y:2014:i:7:p:490-493
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEL20

Order Information: Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAEL20

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Eiji Yamamura, 2009. "Technology transfer and convergence of performance: an economic study of FIFA football ranking," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 261-266.
  2. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2002. "Inducing human capital formation: migration as a substitute for subsidies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 29-46, October.
  3. Dirk G. Baur & Sibylle Lehmann, 2007. "Does the Mobility of Football Players Influence the Success of the National Team?," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp217, IIIS.
  4. DOCQUIER, Frédéric & FAYE, Ousmane & PESTIEAU, Pierre, . "Is migration a good substitute for education subsidies?," CORE Discussion Papers RP -2022, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  5. Ruxanda Berlinschi & Jeroen Schokkaert & Johan F.M. Swinnen, 2010. "When Drains and Gains Coincide: Migration and International Football Performance," LICOS Discussion Papers 26510, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  6. Robert Hoffmann & Lee Chew Ging & Bala Ramasamy, 2002. "The Socio-Economic Determinants of International Soccer Performance," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 253-272, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:21:y:2014:i:7:p:490-493. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.