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Opposition to capital market opening

  • Philipp Engler
  • Alexander Wulff

We employ a neoclassical growth model to assess the impact of financial liberalization in a developing country on capital owners' and workers' consumption and welfare. We find for an average non-OECD country that capital owners suffer a 42% reduction in permanent consumption because capital inflows reduce their return to capital while workers gain 8% of permanent consumption because capital inflows increase wages. These huge gross impacts contrast with the small positive net effect found in a neoclassical representative agent model by Gourinchas and Jeanne (2006). Our findings provide an estimate of the amount of redistribution needed to overcome capitalists' opposition to capital inflows.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/13504851.2013.868579
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 21 (2014)
Issue (Month): 6 (April)
Pages: 425-428

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:21:y:2014:i:6:p:425-428
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  1. Luca Antonio Ricci & Thierry Tressel & Dennis B. S. Reinhardt, 2010. "International Capital Flows and Development; Financial Openness Matters," IMF Working Papers 10/235, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Broner, Fernando A & Ventura, Jaume, 2010. "Rethinking the Effects of Financial Liberalization," CEPR Discussion Papers 8171, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Hoxha, Indrit & Kalemli-Ozcan, Sebnem & Vollrath, Dietrich, 2011. "How Big are the Gains from International Financial Integration?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8647, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Ben Gardiner & Ron Martin & Tyler Peter, 2004. "Competitiveness, Productivity and Economic Growth across the European Regions," ERSA conference papers ersa04p333, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Aizenman, Joshua, 2005. "Opposition to FDI and financial shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 467-476, August.
  6. Theodore H. Moran & Edward M. Graham & Magnus Blomstrom, 2005. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Promote Development?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 3810, December.
  7. An, Galina & Iyigun, Murat F., 2004. "The export skill content, learning by exporting and economic growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 29-34, July.
  8. Crespo Jorge & Martín Carmela & Velázquez Francisco J, 2004. "The Role of International Technology Spillovers in the Economic Growth of the OECD Countries," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 4(2), pages 1-20, December.
  9. Pablo M. Pinto & Santiago M. Pinto, 2008. "The Politics Of Investment Partisanship: And The Sectoral Allocation Of Foreign Direct Investment," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(2), pages 216-254, 06.
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