IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/nathaz/v62y2012i1p17-30.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Determinants of the increased CO 2 emission and adaption strategy in Chinese energy-intensive industry

Author

Listed:
  • Zhaohua Wang

    ()

  • Bin Zhang
  • Jianhua Yin

Abstract

Climate change has not only brought about many natural hazards but also threaten the sustainable development of industry. This study is to investigate the adaptive implications for energy-intensive industries of China in response to climate change impacts. For this purpose, a deep and comprehensive analysis on the change of CO 2 emission for 6 energy-intensive sectors is explored over the period of 2000–2007. A Log-Mean Divisia Index based on time series is also introduced in our study to identify the key factors toward the change of CO 2 emission. It is shown that there were 146.1 million metric tons carbon increased in energy-intensive industries from 2000 to 2007. And the excessive growth of industrial output and increasingly fossil-intensive energy consumption structure were the main driving forces for the increased CO 2 emission. Nevertheless, energy intensity change and declining emission coefficient of electricity played negative role in the growing trend of CO 2 emission. On the basis of these four determinants (namely industrial output, energy intensity, fuel mix effect, and emission coefficient), it is suggested that both economic motives and technologically feasible approaches should be implemented to control the scale of excessive productions and improve energy efficiency toward the energy-intensive industries. And more importantly, strengthening energy-intensive sectors’ awareness of climate change adaptation should be given stronger emphasis as long-term work with the help of some propaganda campaigns for instance. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Zhaohua Wang & Bin Zhang & Jianhua Yin, 2012. "Determinants of the increased CO 2 emission and adaption strategy in Chinese energy-intensive industry," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 62(1), pages 17-30, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:62:y:2012:i:1:p:17-30
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-011-9937-y
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11069-011-9937-y
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ma, Hengyun & Oxley, Les & Gibson, John & Kim, Bonggeun, 2008. "China's energy economy: Technical change, factor demand and interfactor/interfuel substitution," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 2167-2183, September.
    2. M. Monirul Qader Mirza, 2003. "Climate change and extreme weather events: can developing countries adapt?," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 233-248, September.
    3. Liu, Yaobin, 2009. "Exploring the relationship between urbanization and energy consumption in China using ARDL (autoregressive distributed lag) and FDM (factor decomposition model)," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1846-1854.
    4. Feng, Zhen-Hua & Zou, Le-Le & Wei, Yi-Ming, 2011. "The impact of household consumption on energy use and CO2 emissions in China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 656-670.
    5. Mongia, Puran & Schumacher, Katja & Sathaye, Jayant, 2001. "Policy reforms and productivity growth in India's energy intensive industries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 715-724, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Xiangrong Ma & Jianping Ge & Wei Wang, 2017. "The relationship between urbanization, income growth and carbon dioxide emissions and the policy implications for China: a cointegrated vector error correction (VEC) analysis," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 87(2), pages 1017-1033, June.
    2. Thollander, Patrik & Kimura, Osamu & Wakabayashi, Masayo & Rohdin, Patrik, 2015. "A review of industrial energy and climate policies in Japan and Sweden with emphasis towards SMEs," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 504-512.
    3. Wang, Chen & Engels, Anita & Wang, Zhaohua, 2018. "Overview of research on China's transition to low-carbon development: The role of cities, technologies, industries and the energy system," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 81(P1), pages 1350-1364.
    4. Zhaohua Wang & Wei Liu & Jianhua Yin, 2015. "Driving forces of indirect carbon emissions from household consumption in China: an input–output decomposition analysis," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(2), pages 257-272, February.
    5. Zhaohua Wang & Chen Wang & Jianhua Yin, 2015. "Strategies for addressing climate change on the industrial level: affecting factors to CO 2 emissions of energy-intensive industries in China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 75(2), pages 303-317, February.
    6. Max Rånge & Mikael Sandberg, 2016. "Windfall gains or eco-innovation? ‘Green’ evolution in the Swedish innovation system," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(2), pages 229-246, April.
    7. Juan Wang & Tao Zhao & Xiaohu Zhang, 2017. "Changes in carbon intensity of China’s energy-intensive industries: a combined decomposition and attribution analysis," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 88(3), pages 1655-1675, September.
    8. Meng, Bo & Xue, Jinjun & Feng, Kuishuang & Guan, Dabo & Fu, Xue, 2013. "China’s inter-regional spillover of carbon emissions and domestic supply chains," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 1305-1321.
    9. Jia-Yin Yin & Yun-Fei Cao & Bao-Jun Tang, 2019. "Fairness of China’s provincial energy environment efficiency evaluation: empirical analysis using a three-stage data envelopment analysis model," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 95(1), pages 343-362, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:62:y:2012:i:1:p:17-30. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.