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Temporary Carbon Sequestration Cannot Prevent Climate Change

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  • Miko Kirschbaum

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Abstract

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  • Miko Kirschbaum, 2006. "Temporary Carbon Sequestration Cannot Prevent Climate Change," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 11(5), pages 1151-1164, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:11:y:2006:i:5:p:1151-1164 DOI: 10.1007/s11027-006-9027-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lecocq, Franck & Chomitz, Kenneth, 2001. "Optimal use of carbon sequestration in a global climate change strategy : is there a wooden bridge to a clean energy future ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2635, The World Bank.
    2. Ian Noble & R. J. Scholes, 2001. "Sinks and the Kyoto Protocol," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 5-25.
    3. Philip Fearnside & Daniel Lashof & Pedro Moura-Costa, 2000. "Accounting for time in Mitigating Global Warming through land-use change and forestry," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, pages 239-270.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marshall, Liz & Kelly, Alexia, 2010. "The Time Value of Carbon and Carbon Storage: Clarifying the terms and the policy implications of the debate," MPRA Paper 27326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. repec:eee:ecomod:v:223:y:2011:i:1:p:59-66 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Güssow, Kerstin & Proelss, Alexander & Oschlies, Andreas & Rehdanz, Katrin & Rickels, Wilfried, 2010. "Ocean iron fertilization: Why further research is needed," Marine Policy, Elsevier, pages 911-918.
    4. Rickels, Wilfried & Rehdanz, Katrin & Oschlies, Andreas, 2009. "Accounting aspects of ocean iron fertilization," Kiel Working Papers 1572, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Rickels, Wilfried & Rehdanz, Katrin & Oschlies, Andreas, 2010. "Methods for greenhouse gas offset accounting: A case study of ocean iron fertilization," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(12), pages 2495-2509, October.
    6. Philip Fearnside, 2009. "Carbon benefits from Amazonian forest reserves: leakage accounting and the value of time," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, pages 557-567.
    7. Wan-Yu Liu & Qunwei Wang, 2016. "Optimal pricing of the Taiwan carbon trading market based on a demand–supply model," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 209-242, November.
    8. Ajani, Judith I. & Keith, Heather & Blakers, Margaret & Mackey, Brendan G. & King, Helen P., 2013. "Comprehensive carbon stock and flow accounting: A national framework to support climate change mitigation policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 61-72.

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