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Labor market integration policies and the convergence of regions: the role of skills and technology diffusion

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  • Herbert Dawid
  • Simon Gemkow
  • Philipp Harting
  • Michael Neugart

Abstract

We study the role of different labor market integration policies on economic performance and convergence of two distinct regions in an agent-based model. Production is characterized by a complementarity between the quality of the capital stock and the specific skills of workers using the capital stock. Hence, productivity changes in a region are influenced both by the investment of local firms in high quality capital goods and by the evolution of the specific skill distribution of workers employed in the region. We show that various labor market integration policies yield, via differing regional worker flows, to distinct regional distributions of specific skills. Through this mechanism, relative regional prices are affected, determining the shares that the regions can capture from overall consumption good demand. There occurs a trade-off between aggregate output and convergence of regions with closed labor markets resulting in relatively high convergence but low output, and more integrated labor markets yielding higher output but lower convergence. Furthermore, results differ substantially in several respects as distinct labor market opening policies are applied.
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  • Herbert Dawid & Simon Gemkow & Philipp Harting & Michael Neugart, 2012. "Labor market integration policies and the convergence of regions: the role of skills and technology diffusion," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(3), pages 543-562, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:22:y:2012:i:3:p:543-562
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-011-0245-1
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    2. Dosi, G. & Pereira, M.C. & Roventini, A. & Virgillito, M.E., 2019. "What if supply-side policies are not enough? The perverse interaction of flexibility and austerity," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 360-388.
    3. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini & Emmanuele Russo, 2020. "Public Policies And The Art Of Catching Up: Matching The Historical Evidence With A Multi-Country Agent-Based Model," Sciences Po publications 18/2020, Sciences Po.
    4. Dawid, H. & Harting, P. & Neugart, M., 2018. "Cohesion policy and inequality dynamics: Insights from a heterogeneous agents macroeconomic model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 220-255.
    5. Mandel, Antoine & Landini, Simone & Gallegati, Mauro & Gintis, Herbert, 2015. "Price dynamics, financial fragility and aggregate volatility," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 257-277.
    6. Marcel Ausloos & Herbert Dawid & Ugo Merlone, 2015. "Spatial Interactions in Agent-Based Modeling," Dynamic Modeling and Econometrics in Economics and Finance, in: Pasquale Commendatore & Saime Kayam & Ingrid Kubin (ed.), Complexity and Geographical Economics, edition 127, pages 353-377, Springer.
    7. Giovanni Dosi & Marcelo C. Pereira & Andrea Roventini & Maria Enrica Virgillito, 2016. "The Effects of Labour Market Reforms upon Unemployment and Income Inequalities: an Agent Based Model," LEM Papers Series 2016/27, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    8. Furtado, Bernardo Alves & Eberhardt, Isaque Daniel Rocha, 2015. "Modelo espacial simples da economia: uma proposta teórico-metodológica [A simple spatial economic model: a proposal]," MPRA Paper 67005, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini & Emmanuele Russo, 2020. "Public Policies And The Art Of Catching Up," Working Papers hal-03242369, HAL.
    10. Jawadi, Fredj & Mallick, Sushanta K. & Idi Cheffou, Abdoulkarim & Augustine, Anish, 2021. "Does higher unemployment lead to greater criminality? Revisiting the debate over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 182(C), pages 448-471.
    11. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini, 2019. "More is different ... and complex! the case for agent-based macroeconomics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 1-37, March.
    12. Alexandru Mandes, 2020. "Impact of Electronic Liquidity Providers Within a High-Frequency Agent-Based Modeling Framework," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 55(2), pages 407-450, February.
    13. Petrović, Marko & Ozel, Bulent & Teglio, Andrea & Raberto, Marco & Cincotti, Silvano, 2020. "Should I stay or should I go? An agent-based setup for a trading and monetary union," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 113(C).
    14. Cristiano CODAGNONE & Giovanni LIVA & Egidijus BARCEVICIUS & Gianluca MISURACA & Luka KLIMAVICIUTE & Michele BENEDETTI & Irene VANINI & Giancarlo VECCHI & Emily RYEN GLOINSON & Katherine STEWART & Sti, 2020. "Assessing the impacts of digital government transformation in the EU: Conceptual framework and empirical case studies," JRC Working Papers JRC120865, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    15. Dosi, Giovanni & Roventini, Andrea & Russo, Emanuele, 2019. "Endogenous growth and global divergence in a multi-country agent-based model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 101-129.
    16. Georg Jäger & Laura S. Zilian & Christian Hofer & Manfred Füllsack, 2019. "Crowdworking: working with or against the crowd?," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 14(4), pages 761-788, December.
    17. Caiani, Alessandro & Catullo, Ermanno & Gallegati, Mauro, 2019. "The effects of alternative wage regimes in a monetary union: A multi-country agent based-stock flow consistent model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 389-416.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor market integration; Convergence; Skill complementarity; Agent-based model; Regional economics; C63; J61;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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