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Sustained endogenous growth driven by structured and evolving general purpose technologies

  • Kenneth Carlaw

    ()

  • Richard Lipsey

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00191-010-0212-2
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Evolutionary Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 563-593

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Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:21:y:2011:i:4:p:563-593
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  1. Sandro Sapio & Grid Thoma, 2006. "The Growth of Industrial Sectors: Theoretical Insights and Empirical Evidence from U.S. Manufacturing," LEM Papers Series 2006/09, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
  2. Boyan Jovanovic & Peter L. Rousseau, 2005. "General Purpose Technologies," NBER Working Papers 11093, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Jesus Felipe & John McCombie, 2006. "The Tyranny of the Identity: Growth Accounting Revisited," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 283-299.
  4. Paul David & Gavin Wright, 1999. "Early Twentieth Century Productivity Growth Dynamics: An Inquiry into the Economic History of Our Ignorance," Economics Series Working Papers 1999-W33, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Trajtenberg, M. & Bresnahan, T.F., 1992. "General Purpose Technologies: "Engines of Growth"," Papers 16-92, Tel Aviv.
  6. Paul A. David & Gavin Wright, 2005. "General Purpose Technologies and Productivity Surges: Historical Reflections on the Future of the ICT Revolution," Economic History 0502002, EconWPA.
  7. Richard Lipsey & Kenneth Carlaw, 2004. "Total factor productivity and the measurement of technological change," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 1118-1150, November.
  8. Zon Adriaan van & Kronenberg Tobias, 2005. "General Purpose Technologies and Energy Policy," Research Memorandum 011, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  9. Freeman, Chris & Louca, Francisco, 2001. "As Time Goes By: From the Industrial Revolutions to the Information Revolution," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199241071, March.
  10. Kenneth I. Carlaw & Richard G. Lipsey, 2006. "Gpt-Driven, Endogenous Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 155-174, 01.
  11. Bretschger, L. & Smulders, J.A., 2007. "Sustainable resource use and economic dynamics," Other publications TiSEM fb7079e5-6c6e-4960-91f8-8, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  12. Nicholas Crafts, 2003. "Steam as a general purpose technology: a growth accounting perspective," Economic History Working Papers 22354, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  13. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  15. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 1997. "Endogenous Growth or “Big Bang”: Two views of the First Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(04), pages 935-949, December.
  16. Davidson, Paul, 1972. "Money and the Real World," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(325), pages 101-15, March.
  17. Zon,Adriaan,van & Fortune,Emmanuelle & Kronenberg,Tobias, 2003. "How to Sow and Reap as You Go: a Simple Model of Cyclical Endogenous Growth," Research Memorandum 029, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  18. Kenneth I. Carlaw & Richard G. Lipsey, 2007. "SUSTAINED GROWTH DRIVEN BY MULTIPLE, CO-EXISTING GPTs," Discussion Papers dp07-17, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
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