IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Twenty Five Methodological Issues in Memory of Mark Blaug

Registered author(s):

    This paper discusses twenty five methodological issues covering selected areas of both micro and macroeconomics. Included on the micro side are issues related to modelling the price system, assessing its efficiency, competing models of competition, modelling technological change and economic growth, dealing with risk and uncertainty, and policies related to R&D support, picking winners, and support of infant industries. Included on the macro side are issues related to the alleged refutation of old fashioned Keynesian economies by the stagflation of the 1970s, the use of the Dixit Stiglitz model of monopolistic competition in macro models, the current imperative that all the micro behaviour underling macro relations be based on dynamic inter-temporal optimization, the downplaying of fluctuations in aggregate demand as a driver of cyclical fluctuations, and the interpretation of the economy’s recent behaviour.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sfu.ca/econ-research/RePEc/sfu/sfudps/dp12-18.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University in its series Discussion Papers with number dp12-18.

    as
    in new window

    Length: 29
    Date of creation: Nov 2012
    Date of revision: Mar 2013
    Handle: RePEc:sfu:sfudps:dp12-18
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada
    Phone: (778)782-3508
    Fax: (778)782-5944
    Web page: http://www.sfu.ca/economics.html

    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information: Postal: Working Paper Coordinator, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6, Canada
    Web: http://www.sfu.ca/economics/research/publications.html Email:


    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Kenneth Carlaw & Richard Lipsey, 2011. "Sustained endogenous growth driven by structured and evolving general purpose technologies," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 563-593, October.
    2. Robert E. Lucas, Jr. & Thomas J. Sargent, 1979. "After Keynesian macroeconomics," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Spr.
    3. Lipsey, Richard G. & Carlaw, Kenneth I. & Bekar, Clifford T., 2005. "Economic Transformations: General Purpose Technologies and Long-Term Economic Growth," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199290895, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sfu:sfudps:dp12-18. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Working Paper Coordinator)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.